Tag Archives: Ximpoko

RIP Ximpoko

I recently learned some tragic and disturbing news, and further reading today has confirmed it is true.

Ximpoko, a very large male lion who inhabited the Timbavati region of Greater Kruger National Park in South Africa, was killed by trophy hunters in July of 2013.

Ximpoko was one of the first male lions we ever encountered in the wild.  He was a magnificent lion, and was considered to be the largest in the Timbavati.

Ximpoko and another large male lion (possibly Mabande at the time), had formed a coalition, and they roamed the region as nomadic males.  They were not siblings, and were not even from the same pride.

We spent time with Ximpoko and his companion in their natural habitat on Saturday, 6th October, 2012.

Here is an image I captured of Ximpoko, showing him in life:

The King's Face

The King’s Face

The Timbavati, South Africa, and indeed the world, is a lesser place due to the horrible and unnecessary loss of Ximpoko.

Some creature I struggle to regard as human sought entertainment at the expense of the life of an amazing lion, and an endangered species.

Ximpoko deserves to be running around the African savannah, continuing his lineage, not hung on someone’s wall as a decoration.

This was not nature’s way.

I hope that when Ximpoko‘s killer meets his maker, he is shown no mercy.

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More Photographic Highlights from Motswari

During our time in South Africa, and in the Motswari Private Game Reserve in particular, I shot so many images, and even now, barely over two months since we were there, I am still processing and uploading images.

While I have detailed our adventures in the Timbavati here on this blog, in some cases I have not had images ready, and as many photographers know, sometimes an image’s potential only becomes realised some time after having captured it.

Given that I have published a few more images since I verbally and pictorially recalled our adventures, I thought it would be a nice opportunity to provide a few photographic highlights that were previously missed.

So, here are ten photographic highlights, in order of capture.

 

1.  Eye of the Leopard

Eye of the Leopard

Eye of the Leopard

The title Eye of the Leopard is homage to the awesome National Geographic documentary of the same name, shot by Beverly and Dereck Jouvert, featuring the life of Legadema, a young leopard in the Okavango Delta in Botswana.

The leopard in my image is Makepisi (which means “hat” in Shangaan). I captured this image of a stunning leopard on the first game drive we took in the Motswari Private Game Reserve, which is located within the Timbavati region of greater Kruger Park in Mpumalanga province, South Africa.

Makepisi was the very first wild leopard we encountered.

We spent quite a nice time in close proximity to Makepisi, watching, photographing and videoing him.

I also shot video footage of Makepisi.

 

2.  Leopard of the Night

Leopard of the Night

Leopard of the Night

A magical sighting of Makepisi male leopard at night on our first night of our African safari adventure in the Timbavati Private Nature Reserve, greater Kruger Park, South Africa.

As the light fell, Petros, our tracker, brought out the spotlight so we could continue to view and photograph Makepisi as the sun set over a beautiful African savannah landscape in Mpumalanga province.

We saw Makepisi twice during the trip, and he is a special leopard we will always remember.

 

3.  Spotted Hyena

Spotted Hyena

Spotted Hyena

One of the few hyena sightings we had during our stay in the Timbavati.

The spotted hyena is a predatory carnivore which inhabits the bushveld.  It loves to steal the kills made by lions and leopards, and will even terrorise leopards in order to steal their kills.

 

4.  I Spy with My Little Eye

I Spy with My Little Eye

I Spy with My Little Eye

Around 15 minutes after we encountered Rockfig Jr female during our second game drive in the Motswari Private Game Reserve, something caught her attention.

Rockfig Jr got up from the termite mound on which she was resting, and headed over to a thicket, where she keenly watched a bachelor warthog which we had also seen, and which was perhaps 50 to 100 metres away.

There was a possibility that Rockfig Jr would attack the warthog and provide herself a nice breakfast, but instead, she sat watching intently.

She soon returned and came extremely close to us. At one point she was less than two metres behind our open-top Land Rover.  I was perched in the rear part of the vehicle, and it was the closest I had ever been to a leopard.

 

5.  Stare of the Wildbeest

Stare of the Wildebeest

Stare of the Wildebeest

This was one of the earliest sightings of wildebeest in the Motswari Private Game Reserve.

 

6.  Headbangers

Headbangers

Headbangers

Two male impala engaging in sparring. These two were not at war, but were engaging in play-battle. Were a dominant male to encounter an invading male, there would be a much more intense battle for dominance.

 

7.  Giraffe Grazing

Giraffe Grazing

Giraffe Grazing

Africa’s tallest mammal, munching on some delicious leaves.

 

8.  Timbavati Queen

Timbavati Queen

Timbavati Queen

One of the two Jacaranda Pride lionesses we encountered on the morning of our third day of our safari in the Motswari Private Game Reserve.

 

9.  Ximpoko Yawn

Ximpoko Yawn

Ximpoko Yawn

It was early in the evening when we had encountered the Ximpoko male lions of the Timbavati, who had of recent times been causing quite a stir in the region.

After a long, hot day resting, the Ximpoko males were still somewhat tired and prone to sleeping.

At one stage, this particular lion yawned, and I captured it.

A short time later, the two nomads got up, wandered over to another spot up the river bank and settled for a little more rest before the long night that lay ahead for them.

 

10.  Reaching

Reaching

Reaching

While we had a few elephant sightings during our time in the Timbavati, I have not published many images of elephants.

It can be hard to photograph them in clean surroundings, but this image had a cuteness factor which warranted publication.

On our final game drive in the Motswari Private Game Reserve on the morning of 7 October, 2012, we were in off-road in very thick, dry scrub, surrounded by a breeding herd of elephants.

I counted at least 11 elephants that I could see (although there were probably more); and amongst these, there were a few juveniles.

I was fortunate enough to capture this little guy reaching for some delicious leaves and twigs.

Africa: Day 5 – Final Game Drive in Timbavati and Departure to Jo’burg

After an intense fourth day in Africa, during which we saw all five members of the ‘Big Five’ (which, for those who do not know, is a hunting term, not a relative descriptor of animal size) and a decent sleep, we rose before 5am for our final day in Motswari.

We knew that we had only one game drive left, and that later that day, we would be back in Johannesburg.

We headed out before 5:30am, and quickly encountered three elephant bulls which were grazing in a thicket.  The plan for the morning was to head to a termite mound which a pack of hyenas had hijacked and turned into a den.  We would later go looking for a breeding herd of elephants.

After spending a few minutes with the elephant bulls, we departed for the hyena den, and encountered a few zebras along the way.  I shot a few images, but the zebras were in the scrub, which was not good for photography.

A short time later, we arrived at the hyena den hoping to see some cubs.  We spotted only one older hyena cub, which looked at us for perhaps a minute before disappearing into the den, never to be seen (by us) again.

We then headed to Hide Dam, where we were fortunate enough to spot a hyena cub and two adults on the muddy banks.  Here is an image I shot of the hyena cub:

Hyena Cub at Hide Dam

Hyena Cub at Hide Dam

After we left the hyenas, we spotted an African fisheagle high in the tree tops, before Petros soon discovered leopard tracks.  We dropped him in the middle of the Timbavati to see if he could track the leopard, while Chad took Mario, Xenedette and myself in search of more wildlife while Petros was scouting.

Soon enough we encountered a stunning nyala bull walking to our right.  It crossed the dirt track some distance in front of us and then continued on its way through the savannah to our left.

Here is an image of that lone nyala I captured in the warmth of the morning light:

Nyala of Timbavati

Nyala of Timbavati

We continued on, and encountered a herd of zebras.  The herd decided to walk down the road on which we were travelling, and as we continued to follow, the zebras became more skittish and ran further along the road.  We followed them for a few minutes before they continued into the bush, at which we point we headed off.

Chad’s plan was to take us to a breeding herd of elephants.  Before too long, we found ourselves literally surrounded by these gigantic African creatures.  We were slowly navigating the thick bush as we continued to immerse ourselves in the herd.  There were elephants all around us.  I counted at least eleven that I could visually identify from where we were at one point.

The Old Giant

The Old Giant

We spent around 30 minutes following the herd from within it, before heading back to see collect Petros and see how had fared in his quest to find a leopard.  Unfortunately he had no luck funding the elusive leopard.

On our way back to camp, we spotted a few white-backed vultures, more zebras, and a herd of impala drinking at a watering hole.

Soon we arrived back at the lodge.  Alas, our final game drive had ended.

We soon had breakfast and relaxed for a little before it was time to pack our gear.  We had some time to sit for a while, and during our down time, a nyala had come up to the banks of the camp, and was grazing a very short distance from where we had eaten breakfast.  We returned to the communal area where I found Mario photograping the nyala.

A little while later, two warthogs walked right through the tracks on the property, in broad daylight, completely nonplussed by the presence of ourselves and the other guests.

Our flight back to Jo’burg would be departing at around 1pm or 1:30, so we had to start making final preparations for departure, including the very difficult part of saying goodbye to Chad and Petros, knowing it would be a long time before we would see them again, and still on a high from the magic of the past four days.

Chad drove us to the Motswari airstrip, and soon we were boarding the Cessna (incidentally, the exact Cessna 208B Grand Caravan that brought us to Motswari) for the ninety-minute flight back to Jo’burg.  Soon enough we were in the air, departing the place that had changed us; the place that even as I write this article six weeks later, still affects me.

After a short stop to collect passengers from another airstrip nearby, we were in the air again, on the final trip back to Jo’burg.

During the game drive that morning, I had badly injured my ankle as I was repositioning myself inside the Landrover.  While it hurt at the time, as the day wore on, the pain became more intense.

As I was sitting next to Mario in the Cessna, looking down over the landscape I hated to be leaving, the pain became more noticeable.  By the time we got back to OR Tambo airport, I was struggling to walk.

Back at the airport, Xenedette and I had to say our goodbyes to Mario, who was heading off to Egypt later that day to collect a tripod he had left there, before venturing to Spain.  We thanked him for the magical experience we had just had, and promised to keep in touch, which we have done.

That night we were staying again at the Protea Hotel OR Tambo.  We arrived and checked in.  After settling into our room, walking became more difficult.  We headed down to the hotel’s restaurant for dinner, but apart from my physical pain, I felt a sense of emotional pain.  The magic we had experienced over the past four days was over.  We were no longer in the company of Chad and Petros and the amazing Timbavati wildlife, and we were two again.  We felt Mario’s absence as we had dinner, as the last time we sat in that restaurant, he was there with us as we discussed the trip ahead.

By now, walking was extremely difficult, and I was starting to worry, as we had a whole new adventure ahead of us the next day.  After dinner, we retired to our room, where I continued to think about what we had just experienced.  I wrote about it at the time, expressing the feelings I felt at the time.  Some of those feelings still exist now as I recall that night.

The 7th of October, 2012, was the end of an incredible experience that even now I miss.  I continue to read the Motswari Ranger’s Diary, which is a blog written mostly by Chad, as he chronicles the daily game drives he and the other rangers take.  Reading that blog and seeing the images keeps me connected to a place that affected me strongly, as I recall our own experiences, and long for our next trip there.

The 8th of October would introduce a new chapter in our African trip, during which we would fly to Cape Town and experience people, places and adventures that were far removed from Motswari, Chad, Petros, Makepisi, Rockfig Jr, the Jacaranda pride lionesses and the Ximpoko lions that had dominated our existence for the first part of the trip.

Stay tuned for Day 6 of our African trip, and the beginning of our adventures in and around Cape Town.

Africa: Day 4 – The Big Five in One Drive

By Day 4 of our time in Africa, and Day 3 of our safari in the Motswari Private Game Reserve in greater Kruger Park, the motions of waking before 5am, driving in the bushveld for three hours, coming back for breakfast, a rest, lunch and then going out for another game drive from 3:30pm until the darkness of night, had become normal — almost routine.

A rather fantastic routine, that is.

By Day 4 (Day 3 in Motswari), we had been for three game drives, which was half of our safari in terms of wildlife sightings and photography.  We had been out twice for afternoon/evening game drives, and once in the morning.  The 6th of October was a full day worth of game drives, and much awaited us.

Astute readers will have noticed that so far, we had not seen any lions.  We had seen and photographed two unique leopards (Makepisi male and Rockfig Jr female), but the King of the Jungle had been somewhat elusive, which is ironic when it is to be considered that leopards are very elusive, and we had seen two of those.

Lions were very much on the mind of Chad Cocking, our guide.  He was well aware that we had not seen any yet, but he was also aware that lion activity in the reserve had been somewhat subdued over the past few days.  There were some small signs of lion activity, but no guarantee we would encounter any.  Chad probably felt under pressure, but being the reserved professional he is, it did not show.

As we embarked upon our second morning drive at 5:30am before the rest of the guests at the lodge departed 30 minutes later, Xenedette and I were mentally resigned to the fact that we just may not see any lions at all.  However, we were only half-way through our game drives, so the situation was not as dire as it may have seemed.  Still, we were over the moon to have seen everything we had seen to this point, and not seeing lions was not going to otherwise diminish the awe of what we had seen and experienced.

A few minutes into the morning drive, before sunrise, we encountered a giraffe grazing near the Motswari airstrip.  We stopped for some silhouette images against the reddish glow of the pre-sunrise sky.  Here is one of the images I captured:

Standing Tall at Sunrise

Standing Tall at Sunrise

After a short visit with this lanky individual, we proceeded onwards.  Our next stop was Argyle Dam, home to hippos and crocs, and a popualar watering hole for much of the Motswari wildlife.

Chad took the Land Rover onto the muddy banks of Argyle Dam, where we disembarked, and in so doing entered the back yard of the most dangerous animal in Africa: no, not a predatory cat, but the hippopotamus.

Mario and I dashed off for a silhouette landscape we captured just after sunrise, while Chad followed us, and spent his downtime videoing and photographing Mario (our safari leader) and I in action, using one of Mario’s cameras, which he had brought to shoot video footage of the safari.

Throughout the trip he shot his stills with a Canon EOS-1D Mark IV and a Canon EOS 5D Mark II, and used a Canon EOS 60D for video.  Meanwhile, Xenedette and Petros (our tracker) stood on the bank chatting.

Here is an image I captured of a sunrise over Argyle Dam:

Sunrise over Argyle Dam

Sunrise over Argyle Dam

A faint reflection of the rising sun in the water can be seen.  What was more interesting was what we would next see.

The sun continued to rise, and the light became very warm.  We could hear the distinctive grunts and snorts of hippos echoing throughout the morning silence of the Timbavati.  The hippos were only a little way in the distance in Argyle Dam.

Mario and I set about photographing the hippos, patiently waiting for a hippo to yawn, as it makes for much more interesting imagery than what otherwise looks like a submerged rock in the water rather than the hippo that it is.

Finally, our patience paid off.  Not only did we both land shots of a hippo yawning, but the angle and direction of the sunlight backlit the hairs on the hippo’s nose.

The Hippo's Yawn

The Hippo’s Yawn

Soon enough, it was time to make tracks for further wildlife viewing.

Well after sunrise, our next encounter was a pair of southern yellow-billed hornbills perched high atop a tree.  From where we were, even with a focal length of 600mm, it was not going to be possible to feature a hornbill prominently in the frame, so some liberal cropping would later be needed.

We sat for a few minutes, capturing these distinctive birds in their habitat.  Fortunately our vantage point was such that the warm morning light shone upon the hornbills.

Portrait of a Southern Yellow-Billed Hornbill

Portrait of a Southern Yellow-Billed Hornbill

As we continued on our morning drive, we had sightings and captured images of impala, a Wahlberg’s eagle, a solitary crocodile basking in the morning sun, and more impala.

Ten minutes after the most recent impala image I shot, we were laying our eyes upon something magical.

The Motswari trackers and guides had been hard at work, and all of sudden, in front of us, resting on a termite mound in the morning sunshine, were two Jacaranda pride lionesses.  Wow!  Finally, we had seen one of the species of majestic big cats we had longed to see.

Not only did we finally lay our eyes upon wild lionesses, but we were a matter of only a few metres away from them.

Jacaranda Pride Lioness

Jacaranda Pride Lioness

Just to be seeing these regal big cats was an awesome experience, but the photographic opportunities were also fantastic, with warm morning light in the right place, and a relatively clean background.

Even though we were quite close, I used long focal lengths to produce tightly framed portraits, isolating the Jacaranda pride lionesses from the bushveld surrounding them.

Pretty Kitty

Pretty Kitty

During the 25 minutes we spent with the lionesses, something rather unexpected happened.

One of the Jacaranda lionesses got up, climbed down off the mound and wandered about 20 metres away.  We followed her, and observed her doing something out of our direct sight.  Little did we realise at the time, but we had observed the most unexciting lion kill in history.  She had found a small tortoise and killed it!

She returned to the mound, where we shot stills and video of her with the small tortoise in her mouth!  I have not processed or published any images from that spectacle yet, but will eventually get to it.

Soon we departed, had a morning coffee and biscuit on the banks of the Nhlaralumi, and eventually made our way back to the lodge for breakfast.

As exciting as it was to see Jacaranda lionesses towards the end of the morning drive, we did not know that on our afternoon drive, we had see and photograph every African wildlife species in the ‘Big Five’: Cape buffalo, elephant, leopard, lion and rhino.

Within a short time of embarking on our afternoon drive, we encountered six Cape buffalo bulls in the bush near the Sohebele River.  While we stopped to photograph them, I did not land any great images, as the light was still quite harsh and the buffalo were in thick bush, with points of contention being branches, foliage and messy backgrounds.

Our next sightings included kudu, elephants (again in thick scrub under harsh light), a large crocodile on the other side of Argyle Dam (where we had been that morning), and giraffes.  We also spotted baboons running through the scrub, which as it turned out, was to be the only baboon sighting we would have during our time in Africa.

That aside, it had been only 15 minutes, and we had seen and photographed two of the big five.

Our next sighting, merely an hour after embarking, was a familiar creature: Makepisi, the male leopard we had encountered on our first night.  We found him again, less than 48 hours after our first sighting; and looking at the GPS coordinates, he was in almost exactly the same spot.  On this occasion when we found Makepisi, he was sitting in the shade.  The sun was a little lower, but still quite hot, in the high thirties.

I captured a number of images of Makepisi, and have one ready to publish, but have not quite got to it yet; I will post that image on another day.

Our second encounter with Makepisi meant we had seen three members of the Big Five in the one drive.  So far, that is.

The next sighting was an elephant bull grazing in the scrub, and we spent a bit of time there watching, photographing and videoing him.

As the sun got lower in the sky, our next encounter was three white rhino grazing in the warm afternoon light.  They were heading for a drink, so we got ahead of them and parked down on the banks on the watering hole in anticipation of their arrival.  I kept my eyes on the bush up the banks, and spotted the tell-tale shape and movement the first rhino.  Sure enough, two of the rhino came down to the waterline for a drink, with the third following a short time later.

Fresh from a Mud Bath

Fresh from a Mud Bath

This rhino sighting clocked four of the Big Five.

The best, and last member of the Big Five was yet to come, only we did not know it.

Less than 20 minutes after watching white rhino drinking from a watering pan, we found ourselves in a dry river bed where two Ximpoko male lions were resting in the late afternoon light.  Another big wow!

Seeing male lions was a real highlight of  this drive, and of the whole day.  We were rapidly losing light, and the lions were quite sleepy, but we did manage to land a few shots and witness them moving around a little, with just a hint of a roar from one of them.

I managed to land a pleasing image of one of the Ximpoko males looking directly at us, and what a majestic lion he was.

The King's Face

The King’s Face

As darkness fell, Petros brought out the spotlight for some lion light painting!

The King of Timbavati

The King of Timbavati

The lions soon moved up the river bank and plonked themselves on the ground for more rest and sleep before the big night they had ahead of them.  We shortly thereafter departed and rushed back to the lodge.

A pleasant and unexpected surprise was a sighting of two porcupines in the bush along the road.  During the night drives, Petros waved his spotlight in an arc across our field of vision, looking for wildlife.  How he managed to see these two porcupines in the darkness and hindered by the speed at which we were travelling, I do not quite know; but he is a tracker, and his job is to find the wildlife that prefers not to be found!

Earlier that day, I had mentioned to our party that it was Xenedette’s birthday.  To have seen all members of the Big Five in one day, and even more incredibly, in one drive, was a magnificent birthday present.  Of seeing what we saw that day, Xenedette said it was the best birthday present she could ever have received.  There we were, in the African bushveld, seeing and photographing some amazing wildlife, right in the thick of nature’s finest.

We soon arrived back at the lodge, and headed to the boma (escorted, of course) for dinner and celebratory drinks.  It was Xenedette’s birthday, and she had experienced some amazing sightings that day.  A cause for celebration indeed, and there we were, having the experience of a lifetime.  What a day it had been.

Stay tuned for Day 5 of our African trip, which would be our final day in the Timbavati.