Tag Archives: Rain

2015 Retrospective: Intense and Focused

Now that we are well into the year 2016, it is time for a retrospective look at my photographic journey in 2015.

The year can be summarised as intense and focused, as the majority of images I captured during 2015 were in the Mara North Conservancy and Maasai Mara National Reserve in Kenya, where we embarked upon an incredible seven-day safari with our friend and safari leader Mario Moreno.

Looking at my statistics, I shot more images in 2015 than I did in the years 2013 and 2014 combined.

Had the Kenya trip not happened, I suspect I would not have shot much.

Photographically, my year started quite late — near the end of April — with a macro/still life image of a new watch I had been given:

Certina 1888

Certina 1888

We had some family in town from overseas, so I took the opportunity to shoot some cityscape images from a location at which I had not shot before.

One afternoon we headed to the Glebe apartment and I waited for the right light to capture some views of the beautiful city skyline.

This was the result:

Dusk Descendence

Dusk Descendence

And a little later, during blue hour:

The View Sucks

The View Sucks

I also took the opportunity to capture this tight view of the Anzac Bridge as twilight fell:

Anzac Bridge

Anzac Bridge

In May, we all had an outing at the Wild Life Sydney Zoo in Darling Harbour.  I took a camera and a couple of lenses, but I did not shoot a great deal of images.

This image of a kangaroo was one of the more pleasing images I captured on the day:

One of Skippy's Mates

One of Skippy’s Mates

Later in the month, I felt compelled to head out and shoot another cityscape.

In the mid-to-late afternoon, I scouted for some vantage points along the western side of Circular Quay, and finally settled on the observation deck of the International Passenger Terminal, which affords a higher view, and additionally was empty and free from passers by.

I waited for the blue hour, and captured this view of Sydney which I have not seen (or photographed) before.

Circular Quay West

Circular Quay West

It had been a slow, but pleasing enough start to the year.

In June, the photography I had been eagerly anticipating since we booked the trip the previous year, would finally happen.

We headed to Kenya to spend seven days in the Mara North Conservancy and Maasai Mara National Reserve, where we would re-ignite our passion for wildlife and landscape photography.

So far I have published over 100 images from that trip, so I will not publish a great deal of those images in this article; but as the trip brought us a lot of first-time encounters, I will instead present some selected highlights from the trip.

We were based in the luxurious eco-lodge Elephant Pepper Camp, which afforded us total isolation and positioning right in the middle of where the action was.

This is a view of one of Elephant Pepper Camp‘s honeymoon/family tents:

Elephant Pepper Camp's Honeymoon Tent

Elephant Pepper Camp’s Honeymoon Tent

And this is a view of the camp at twilight, depicting the dining tent, lounge and camp fire:

Around the Camp Fire

Around the Camp Fire

Highlights of the trip included one of my finest bird images, which was my first frame of only two I snapped while this pied kingfisher was bobbing up and down in flight:

Suspended

Suspended

Just about every day, we were treated to lions — most prominently, the Cheli Pride.  One of the fantastic things about the Cheli Pride was its abundance of cubs, and on this trip, it was our first time seeing wild cubs, such as this cute little lion:

Lion Cub of the Cheli Pride

Lion Cub of the Cheli Pride

On one afternoon, we were fortunate enough to spend some time, in pleasing, afternoon light, in very close proximity to a lilac-breasted roller, where I captured this and a number of other images of the national bird of South Africa:

Plumage

Plumage

Naturally, a safari in Africa encompasses more than just wildlife — there are amazing opportunities for stunning, iconic landscape shots, and we certainly took advantage of that, rolling out into the plains in the pre-dawn darkness before other safari-goers were even awake.

This was one of my earlier landscape shots, captured during a moody morning:

The Moody Mara Plains

The Moody Mara Plains

On another morning, we captured the ‘postcard shot’ of a rising sun behind a lone acacia tree:

Sunrise on the Mara

Sunrise on the Mara

This particular tree is known as Mario‘s Tree, as Mario often photographs it.  We certainly did — several times — including one particular morning which greeted us with a colourful sky:

Lone Acacia

Lone Acacia

On only our second day on this trip, we were treated to a number of first-time encounters.  In the morning, we encountered our first Mara leopard, who was also also the first leopard we had seen in a tree; and in the evening we found our first male lion of the trip, again a member of the resident Cheli Pride.

We had gone back to Leopard Gorge to look for the young male cat, when we found a large, dominant male lion in the area instead.  If the leopard was around, he was hiding and would not be seen.

Here is the beautiful young male leopard perched high in an elephant pepper tree:

Leopard of the Day

Leopard of the Day

We not only encountered one male lion, but two!  His brother also emerged from the distance and joined him for some bonding and lazing before the night‘s hunting commenced.

Here is one of the stunning Cheli Pride males we encountered:

Surveying

Surveying

The day after we met the dominant males, we encountered numerous members of the pride, minus the males, feasting on a zebra kill the next afternoon.  This was another ‘first’ for us, as we had hitherto never seen lions feasting on a kill.  It was quite a sight, as this wider image shows:

Feast

Feast

The next day, we spent a dramatic afternoon with the Cheli Pride again, firstly as we encountered one of the mothers on her own, out in the open, calling for the pride.

Here is an image I captured of the lioness in the warm afternoon light:

Cheli Mother

Cheli Mother

Before long, a mighty rainstorm descended upon us, which made the big cat uncomfortable, as well as presenting challenges for us.  As the rain began to subside, camera shutters sounded like rapid gunfire as we captured action shots of the lioness shaking the water from her head.

Shake It Off

Shake It Off

Towards the end of the trip, we spent one day further south in the Maasai Mara National Reserve, where we experienced yet another first.

So far, the one species of African big cat we had never seen in the wild was the cheetah.  On that trip, we finally encountered wild cheetahs.  It was an exciting experience to firstly see them from a distance, and then drive to position ourselves optimally to be ahead of where they were headed.  It became more exciting as the cheetahs got closer, and I had a few opportunities to photograph the family, which consisted of a mother and four sub-adults.

Here is one of the nicer images I captured of these amazing big cats:

Portrait of a Young Cheetah

Portrait of a Young Cheetah

It had been a long wait, but finally we spent some time with wild cheetahs.

Our next morning in the Mara consisted of a portrait shoot with Maasai tribesman called Baba, with whom we travelled to Mario‘s Tree, where we shot some dramatic silhouette portraits of him as the sun rose on one of our final days in the Mara.

Here is one of the more striking images I captured during the session:

Baba the Maasai

Baba the Maasai

Our final evening in the Mara brought something we could have never predicted, and something which is quite rare to see: mating leopards!

At first, we spotted a young female leopard high in a tree during the warm afternoon light, but within a short time, a large, amourous male emerged from the thicket, and the two leopards began (or continued with) their ritual of rapid, exposive mating sessions, which can last for days.

We spent the rest of the drive witnessing this amazing sight, and the following image captures an intense moment as the female expresses her displeasure at the male’s advances:

Growl of the Leopardess

Growl of the Leopardess

The next morning was our final, somewhat subdued game drive in the Mara before we would fly back to Nairobi for a night and another day before departing Kenya.  We were fortunate to encounter a small pod of hippos in a watering hole, where I had the opportunity to capture some relatively close-proximity images, such as this large hippo on the bank, less than 30 metres away:

Hippo on the Bank

Hippo on the Bank

Before too long, this amazging photographic journey came to its conclusion.

After the intensity of our Mara trip, and my generally low photographic output before the trip, it was not surprising that I did not shoot much afterwards.  In fact, I shot only one more image for the remaining six months of the year!

The one image I did capture was a macro image of some red and orange roses to commemmorate our anniversary.

Fifth

Fifth

And so concludes my photographic journey for 2015.  It indeed was an intense and focused year, with Kenya dominating my photographic output, but with a few other images here and there.

Maasai Mara: Day 4 of 7

Our fourth day in the Maasai Mara region of south-western Kenya had arrived after a good night’s sleep following the magical big cat activity and stunning skies we had witnessed the day before.

As had become our habit by now, we were again the first to rise from slumber at 5am, walking through the darkness of the camp, with our Maasai guard leading the way, towards the freshly stoked but unoccupied campfire, where the other guests at Elephant Pepper Camp would meet later on, well after we had already departed into the plains under the cover of darkness to capture the pre-dawn light and sunrise.

We headed to Mario‘s Tree again, which is located maybe one or two kilometres west of camp, taking five to eight minutes to reach by 4WD.

In the rapidly fading dawn, we parked a little further away from the acacia, and jumped out of the vehicle, armed with long lenses and the monopod.

We were aiming for a silhouette shot of Mario‘s Tree against the stunning colours of the African morning sky, and it did not disappoint, as can be seen in the following image:

Crimson Mara

Crimson Mara

Some stunning clouds were lingering in the eastern sky as the sun below the horizon bounced warm light rays off the clouds, producing an intense crimson colour against which the lone acacia stood out.

There was scattered plains game in the distance, and in this image, I captured a disant topi watching us, acutely aware of our presence.

A short time later, the sun peeked over the horizon and quickly rose, warming up the plains as we snapped away with 300mm and 400mm lenses.  I captured a ‘post card’ image of the African sun rising, with Mario‘s Tree providing striking contrast against the rich orange sky.

Sunrise on the Mara

Sunrise on the Mara

Again our topi friend photobombed me, but I wanted him in the scene, as he added a sense of scale, and added life and context to a scene which would otherwise just be a landscape.  There is no mistaking this place for anywhere other than Africa when one sees an acacia tree and antelope on the savannah with a sunrise and warm sky in the distance.

We shot our last sunrise frame at 6:47am, by which time the sun had risen a little higher, but still remained quite low in the sky.

We decided to head off and look for lions again.  We ventured east-south-east, and four minutes later encountered a jackal scurrying around.  These little fox-like creatures can be very difficult to photograph, as they are constantly moving.  I snapped away furiously, and finally the jackal stood still enough for me to land a decent portrait.

The Jackal

The Jackal

By the time I captured this portrait, the light had become warm and almost golden, which made for a very flattering image of the jackal‘s reddish coat against the greens and browns of the plains.

A mere few minutes later, we continued on our search for lions.  Along the way we spotted a lone topi and grabbed a quick shot, but we pressed on, and eventually arrived at a spot south-east of camp, where we had found the Cheli Pride.  There were two or three lionesses and as many as eight cubs, which strolled along in the medium-length grasses.

I captured a few images of the Cheli cubs wandering around in the warm morning light, but I did not capture anything particularly fantastic, as reeds were typically cutting right across the cubs’ faces, thus ruining the shots.

We only stayed with the pride for three minutes before Francis banked sharply north and drove a few hundred meters to the zebra kill site we had visited on the previous afternoon.  We wanted to see if there was anything left.  The Cheli Pride lions we had just seen had moved south of the kill site, as they were done resting, and probably did not hunt overnight.

We found a breeding herd of elephants close to the kill site.  The elephants were calm, which was probably due to the fact that the lions were a few hundred metres south, and did not pose a threat.

We spent a good 12 minutes watching and photographing the elephants, which were somewhat playful.  Some of the larger herd members interacted affectionately with each other, which sent our cameras into rapid-fire mode as we captured these majestic giants playing in the warm golden light.

Trunk Wrestling

Trunk Wrestling

Here, two of the larger adults are engaging in some trunk wrestling during playtime.

Elephant Embrace

Elephant Embrace

These tender moments provided a strong contrast to the extreme but necessary violence which had taken a few metres from here the previous morning as the Cheli Pride took down and devoured a zebra which had straggled from the herd and been targeted by the lionesses, always looking for their next meal.

We moved over to the kill site and found that there was not much left.  The hyenas had probably been there during the night, and there were only a few signs of the deceased zebra left.  However, in the morning light, four jackals and a lone hyena had arrived at the scene to steal the last of the pickings, which were enough to provide a meal for some predators.

The jackals picked away at a few pieces of zebra remains, and a hyena emerged from the distance, grabbed a chunk and trotted off into longer grasses in the distance, where I captured him on the lookout.

Hyena on the Lookout

Hyena on the Lookout

While the predation of an animal is nature’s way in the wilderness, and at times difficult to watch or accept, nothing goes to waste, and one animal’s demise represents the continued survival of other species.  It is a fine balance, but it works.

Francis drove a little to the west, where we witnessed and photographed an elephant engaging in a colossal toilet break, emptying himself of hundreds of litres of water he had been drinking during the previous evening.

We then headed south, as the morning was wearing on and hunger was setting in.  Shortly before we stopped for a bush breakfast near a Talek River tributary, we spotted the brilliant blue and orange colours of a Hildebrandt’s starling perched on a branch.

After breakfast, we headed back to camp.

We did not capture any more images along the way back, until we encountered a grassland pipit just a few minutes away from camp.  We stopped and photographed the pipit for a minute, during which time I captured the bird calling before he promptly flew away.

Grassland Pipit

Grassland Pipit

After lunch and some more time processing and publishing images, poking around online and doing some backing up of image and video files, we headed back out into the Mara plains.

Having encountered the Cheli Pride quite a few times, we went out looking for these lions again.  We had seen the lions in the morning, not far south from the kill site, so it was likely that they would still be in the general area.

Francis drove south-east of camp, right back to the area where we had been in the presence of the Cheli Pride for the last few game drives.

Just north-east of where we had found the pride earlier in the morning, we found one of the Cheli lionesses sitting on her own, out in the open, on a patch of grass.

The 4pm afternoon light was casting a warm glow on her as she began looking for the rest of the pride members, who at the time were not immediately nearby.

In the warm light, I captured this portrait of the Cheli lioness as she awaited the return of her cubs:

Cheli Mother

Cheli Mother

She is not paticularly happy, as shown by her hunched position and the semi-flattening of her ears.

Typical of an afternoon in the Mara, a thunderstorm was brewing, and rain soon started to fall.

The lioness was intently looking into the distance left of frame, and began roaring to call her cubs.  She was plagued by flies, as indeed were we from our position 16 metres away from her.  The constant pestering by the flies, and the rain, which began to soak her, made for an unhappy lioness.

She really wanted her cubs to return to her.  They were around… somewhere… but were not quick to respond to her roars.

The rain became heavier and heavier, and the lioness got wetter and wetter, as did we.  While we had a canvas canopy above us, many parts of it were torn, and the rain pooled up and dripped onto us, covering our lenses, as well as us!  My lens was already half-exposed to the rain as I perched it on the camera platform and continued photographing the lionesses.

The lioness‘s roars became more intent and louder as she sought the company of her cubs while suffering the unpleasantness of the pounding rain.

I captured this image of the lioness in the middle or a roar:

Roaring in the Rain

Roaring in the Rain

Every now and then, the rain-soaked lionesses would shake her head rapidly to drain herself from the constant drenching she was enduring.

Mario and I began trying to capture the rapid motion of her periodic head shakes, and became very excited when we landed a sharp action image like this:

Shake It Off

Shake It Off

I would rate this as one of my best wildlife action images.  I would have liked a faster shutter speed to freeze the water droplets entirely, but the lioness‘s eyes and nose are in sharp focus, which is pleasing.

She continued roaring for the pride, and showed her eager anticipation of the arrival of her cubs.

Anticipation

Anticipation

During the next 20 minutes, she continued sitting in this position, roaring in the rain, before she got up and wandered a few hundred metres north towards the kill site, where, maybe 20 metres from the site, she sat down again and continued roaring and smelling the air for signs of proximity to the other lions.

At long last, there were signs of the other Cheli Pride lion cubs and lionesses nearby, as they emerged from the distance and headed towards the lone lioness, finally placating her after much calling and longing for their return.

As the other pride members approached, the lions all headed a few hundred metres south, so we followed, and once we perched ourselves nearby, we were treated to the joy of seeing a pride reunited.

As the lions greeted, groomed and played together in the open grass, our cameras were intently snapping and filming away as the light rapidly fell during the transition from late afternoon to early evening.

Here is a view of some of the members of the Cheli Pride, reunited after a lioness’s long endurance of flies, a rainstorm and the absence of her family:

Reunited

Reunited

After some time spent with the Cheli Pride, it was time to head back to camp, and what a fantastic way to finish the day: seeing a pride of lions together, enjoying each other’s company, and grooming, playing and resting before the long night ahead.

Stay tuned for our adventures on day five of our trip to the Maasai Mara, during which we would head out of the Mara North Conservancy and into the Maasai Mara National Reserve, closer to Tanzania.  It was a huge day, in which we saw wild cheetahs for the first time, and also got to witness lions aggression as a dispute over a meal escalated.

Turimetta Swell

This is an image I shot in January of 2012 at Sydney‘s well-photographed Turimetta Beach.

Turimetta Swell

Turimetta Swell

This particular scene is further away from the main gorge and rocks featured in so many images.

The morning brought a few successful images, but this one had sat untouched and unpublished for the past three years.

A moody, rain-laden sky combined with a decent swell made for some pleasing cascades and flows along the rock shelf towards North Narrabeen.

Shalom from Tel Aviv

Shalom from Tel Aviv.

Xenedette and I are in Israel for a few weeks.

Tonight we headed to the Azrieli Centre in central Tel Aviv, where I shot this twilight cityscape looking south-west over Tel Aviv and towards the Mediterranean Sea.

Tel Aviv by Night

Tel Aviv by Night

Unbelieveable as it may sound, our time in Israel so far has been wet, stormy, windy and cold. We have not seen much sun at all, and in this image, heavy patches of rain can be seen moving into Tel Aviv from the sea.

Not long after I captured this image, the rain poured heavily, thus ending the cityscape session.

Contrasting Conditions at Turimetta

Here are two vastly different images from the same dawn seascape shoot at Turimetta last Tuesday.

Seaweed

Seaweed

The first image above was taken shortly after arrival, and in the pre-dawn darkness, the moving water is abstracted to the point where its movement is almost invisible.  A sense of calm is evoked as the clump of seaweed sits stranded on the sand bank.

Nearly an hour later, I shot this image:

Northern Aspect

Northern Aspect

The above image is very different to the first, in that the distant brooding sky, turmoil in the water and calm, warm tones of the rocks provide contrast within the image itself, and also contrast with the earlier image.

This goes to show that it is possible, in the same shoot at the same general location, to achieve varying images with a distinctly different look and feel.

Turimetta Triumph

After some recent strong urges to return to seascaping, I jumped back in (figuratively and literally) this morning.

At 4:45am, I met Tony at Turimetta (a veritable ‘Mecca’ for seascape photographers) on Sydney‘s Northern Beaches, and we headed down to the famous Turimetta gorge on the southern end of the beach.  My original intention was to shoot the northern end, which I hve only shot once; however, there was plenty happening at the southern end.

There was some patchy rain and some thick layers of cloud, which I could tell would make for some dramatic seascaping that would be easy on exposure.

After a few early compositions in and near the gorge, I found something further out on the rock shelf which grabbed my attention.

Here is the result:

Turimetta Triumph

Turimetta Triumph

It was a fantastic feeling to be out on the rock shelf, splashing around in water and having fresh, cool ocean water surround me and my tripod as the waves and swell came crashing in under a tempestuous sky.

I am pleased that my first seascape of 2012 was greeted with very favourable conditions, and I am looking forward to my next shoot at a more exciting location on Saturday.

In the coming days I will have some fresh images from this morning‘s rewarding shoot.

I am back.