Tag Archives: Offbeat Pride

Maasai Mara 2019: Day 5 of 7

On the morning of our fifth day in the Maasai Mara during this most recent trip, we woke at 5am as usual to prepare for an early start, with the intention of engaging in some landscape photography at dawn.

Unfortunately, for the fifth day in a row, the sky was terrible, and was visibly hopeless even in the darkness as we huddled around the camp fire.  The notion was quickly aborted, and once we boarded the 4WD, we headed south towards the Offbeat area.

About half-way there, we spotted an elephant in the distance.  Unusually, we had seen very few elephants during this trip.  Unlike the last trip, these giants were just not around.  We did not stop for photography, instead continuing further south.

We did not know this at the time, but we were about to experience a special sighting.  I suspect Francis already knew ahead of time, but we were none the wiser.

Around 30 minutes later, we arrived at a dramatic scene of the Offbeat Pride of lions feasting on a buffalo!

Three or four other vehicles were also at the scene as the lions gorged themselves.  Much of the kill had been devoured, but there was still plenty of food for the pride.

While it is not highly unusual for experienced lions to take down buffalo, it is quite a dangerous task, as buffalo are large, aggressive and armed with horns which could seriously injure or kill a lion.  The two species are eternal enemies, and buffalo will launch attacks on vulnerable lions, particularly cubs.

Feasting on the carcass were a several lionesses, a large pride male and several cubs.

Here is one of the many images I captured as the feast played out in front of us:

Table Manners

Table Manners

Here, the large pride male feasts, while one of the females snarls as she contends to get her share.

Naturally, the lions were not alone, as a few jackals were also lurking nearby, hoping for a piece of the action.

We spent nearly 45 minutes watching, photographing and filming as the lions consumed their meal.  I captured a lot of video footage of the lions feasting, from which I will eventually produce a video (or maybe more than one) of this trip.

During the feast, the male lion was very patient and tolerant of the cubs, only snarling and snapping once as another lion got too close.

Soon enough, the the pride male finished, and stood up.  Mario, knowing lion behaviour well, knew that the male would wander off for a drink and a rest.

Our next step was clear: we had to hastily depart the scene, get ahead of the lion and place ourselves where he would be likely to find water so that we would be able to photograph him drinking.

Within a few seconds, Francis sped off in a westerly direction, where a short distance away, there was a creek.  It was a rush, both literally and metaphorically, as we had very little time to beat the lion to his destination so that we could capture images that nobody else would capture.

The other vehicles all stayed at the kill scene.  The inhabitants of the other vehicles were probably wondering why we would suddenly race away from the scene of a pride feasting on a kill, but they did not have the Dream Team of Mario and Francis, who knew what the male lion would do, and where he would go.

Only five or six minutes after the pride male departed the kill scene, we were positioned on the western side of the creek, which runs from the Olare Orok River to the south.

All of a sudden, we saw the impressive male lion arrive on the scene, and begin drinking from the creek.

After he had lapped up some water, he decided to cross. Francis had done an excellent job of positioning the vehicle so that we were looking straight down a slope the lion would climb.  He would be heading straight towards us.  And he did!

Here is a tight portrait I captured of the pride male as he ascended the bank, looking straight at us:

Thirst Quenched

Thirst Quenched

Very noticeable is an injury to his nose.  I am not sure if he was injured during the kill, or if this was an older injury and he happens to have some of his meal still on his face.  Either way, it was fantastic to have this large pride male heading straight towards us.

Xenedette captured a fantastic video of this lion crossing the water, climbing the bank, heading straight towards us and then veering off to his right, only one or two metres from the 4WD.

The pride male headed off to find a resting place, high on a ridge.  We then raced back to the kill scene, where a lioness and three cubs were still feasting.  We captured more images and video footage from a different angle.

Sure enough, it was time for the female and the cubs to depart in search for water, so again, Francis raced back towards the creek so that we could intercept the lions and photograph them drinking and crossing the creek.

Rather than attempting to cross the creek where the pride male had crossed a short time ago, the lioness and her cubs ventured a little further north, trying to find a suitable crossing point.

We had the opportunity to see the lions drinking, and caught a few glimpses as they were out in the open on a grassy bank.

Eventually they crossed, and the female headed further west, about half-way between the creek and the ridge, where she rested under an acacia bush.

Soon she was joined by a very handsome male cub, where I captured this image of the two lions planning their next move.

Planning the Next Move

Planning the Next Move

The lions had by now probably spotted the male high on the ridge to the west, and set off to join him.

The cute male cub ventured into the open, where I captured him in the warmth of the morning sun.

Heading Towards Mummy

Heading Towards Mummy

On this morning, I had decided that I needed some downtime back at camp, so we had earlier arranged for a private breakfast back at camp.

After a wonderful morning spent with the Offbeat Pride of lions feasting on a buffalo, drinking and crossing the creek, we made our way north back to camp for a nice outdoor breakfast and some time to rest and take care of the image transfer and backup housekeeping I regularly do while on safari.

After some highly needed downtime, we joined the other guests for lunch, and then had some afternoon drinks and spent some time processing images before it was time to head back out into the field.

For afternoon drive, we headed north towards Mara North Airstrip, and within a short period of time stumbled upon some action.

We encountered a clan of hyenas feasting on a topi.  Earlier, probably while we were back at camp, two sibling male cheetahs had killed a topi and quickly lost their kill to the hyenas.

Stolen Lunch

Stolen Lunch

Unfortunately, a high percentage of kills made by cheetahs, usually of antelopes such as Thomson’s gazelle, impala and less commonly, topi, are stolen by hyenas.

As hyenas are powerful and aggressive predators, cheetahs often flee rather than trying to defend their kills.  In this case, the hyenas had won.

In the distance, we spotted Mbili and Milele, who are two sons of a female cheetah called Kiraposhe.  They were heading east, away from their stolen lunch.

Mbili and Milele roam freely between the Mara North Conservancy, Lemek Conservancy and Olare Motorogi Conservancy.

As the brothers were heading eastward, we did the same, getting ahead of Mbili and Milele so that we could intercept them and photograph and video them coming towards us.

Here is an image I captured of one of the siblings.

Defeated

Defeated

The look on this cheetah‘s face says it all: defeated.

His head is down, his ears are flat, and his demeanour is forlorn.

With numerous hyenas on the kill scene, Mbili and Milele had no choice but to depart, and they moved quite quickly towards Lemek Conservancy.

For us, it was a matter of racing ahead, capturing images, and then moving off again to continually track them from the direction in which they were ultimately heading.

Further east, the cheetahs were out in the open, and I had the opportunity to capture this image of Mbili:

Mbili on a Mission

Mbili on a Mission

We continued tracking the cheetahs further eastward, until we landed at Mara North Conservancy Headquarters.  This marks the boundary between Mara North Conservancy and Lemek Conservancy.

We could not enter Lemek Conservancy, as no reciprocal entry agreement exists between the two conservancies; so we had no choice but to leave Mbili and Milele to continue on their journey into Lemek Conservancy.

We headed north-west, and in less than 20 minutes, encountered the Cheli Pride of lions.  As always, it was fantastic to see the Cheli Pride.

This time, the pride was located in and near a tributary running from the Mara River.  We first spotted a lioness resting on a mound out in the open.

Cheli Pride at Rest

Cheli Pride at Rest

We quickly discovered that there were other lions nearby, taking shelter down the ravine.  After venturing around to the other side of the tributary, we saw a wildebeest kill down the ravine.

Amongst the pride were some very young cubs, and as the late afternoon progressed, the cubs became more active, coming out from their hiding place to explore.

One of the cubs came right out into the open, and was soon joined by a sibling.  An opportunity to capture a clean image of two very cute lion cubs in the open is not one to be missed!

Cuteness Convention

Cuteness Convention

After spending some very pleasant time in the company of the Cheli Pride, we headed off to look for a landscape photography opportunity.

When we are on safari, we anticipate and look for landscape photography opportunities during every dawn/sunrise and sunset/dusk.

We headed south to look for some interesting acacia trees to capture in silhouette at sunset.  Along the way, Mario spotted some giraffes, and was keen to photograph those against the western sky; but I was determined that we continue our pursuit for some pleasing landscape photography images, as so far we had not been rewarded with favourable conditions.

Soon enough we spotted three acacia trees which looked viable.  I had my eye on one, but Mario had his eye on another, and we went with his choice.

Once again, the sky in the west was looking decidedly terrible, but as every keen landscape photographer knows, it always pays to look in every direction.

While the Western sky was a non-event, to the north and east were some ominous clouds.  As the sun descended, we were greeted with an intense, brilliant golden hour.

Facing the acacia tree with our backs to the sun, we were able to capture rich golden colours on the Mara plains as a dark, brooding, rain-laden sky served as the backdrop.

Here is one of the earlier images I captured:

Golden Acacia

Golden Acacia

I love the richness of the beautiful light.  Late afternoon light looks most dramatic when the sun has a clear path towards a dark sky in the east.

While I was on the south-western side of this Mario was north of me, shooting a very different image of a ranger’s hut which was nearby.  He was excited about the hut, but I found it ugly and wanted to focus on the acacia tree instead.

The light was changing very rapidly, so we both scrambled around, changing positions and even lenses to capture some different views of the same subject.

I ran north-east, and borrowing Mario‘s 70-200mm lens, I opted for a vertical composition of the acacia tree from further back, positioned right near the ugly hut Mario had been photographing.

Here is the resulting image:

Quintessential

Quintessential

The light was falling, so I did something I was never intending to do, and photographed the ugly hut!

The Ugly Hut

The Ugly Hut

Africa is a land of contrasts.

This is a man-made shelter, used by rangers or farmers during the day.

It is an ugly, thrown-together, metal shed with nothing inside and no purpose other than to provide temporary shelter for people needing it when out on the expansive plains.

It looks wrong in such a land of beauty.  It completely contrasts with the natural beauty which exists in the form of the acacia tree, the plains and the dramatic sky to the east.

We photographed it anyway, if for nothing else than to show something different, and highlight the contrast that exists between man and nature in the Maasai Mara.

This was my final shot of the day before we headed back to camp for pre-dinner drinks and a communal dinner with the other guests.

What a day was Wednesday, 5th of June, 2019.  We experienced a fantastic sighting of the Offbeat Pride of lions feasting on a buffalo, photographed the large pride male drinking and crossing a creek (followed by a lioness and cubs a short while later); experienced a new cheetah encounter, during which we saw and followed Kiraposhe’s sons Mbili and Milele, who had lost their lunch to hyenas; enjoyed another encounter with the Cheli Pride in the late afternoon, and finished the day with some rewarding landscape photography in beautiful golden hour light.

The big cats had truly been the stars of the show on this day.  We still had not found a leopard, but we had a few more drives before the trip was to conclude, so there would be more opportunities.

Stay tuned for our adventures on day six.

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Maasai Mara 2019: Day 2 of 7

On our second day in the Maasai Mara region of Kenya during our Africa trip of 2019, we rose early in preparation for a hot drink around the camp fire with Mario, Francis and the Elephant Pepper Camp crew, before setting out into the plains in the darkness.

Our plan for this morning, and indeed for every morning in the Mara, was to shoot some landscape images at dawn and sunrise.

As we chatted around the warmth of the camp fire in cool morning air, the increasingly lightening sky revealed a lot of cloud cover, which was not promising for landscape images, but we set out anyway, as conditions can change quickly, and there is no certain way of knowing what the sky will do.

We headed a short drive west of camp to a familiar location: Mario’s Tree.

Mario’s Tree is an iconic acacia tree in the Mara North Conservancy, named after Mario Moreno (he laid claim to this tree, as he photographs it during most visits), which is very photogenic, and well positioned in altitude and location for shooting landscape images against the rising sun.

We naturally had to return to photograph it again during our second visit to the Mara.

Mario's Tree Revisited

Mario’s Tree Revisited

The conditions this time were vastly different, and the sunrise on this particular morning was far from spectacular; but it was nice to return to a familiar landmark in the coolness and quiet of dawn before venturing out further into the plains for our morning game drive.

For images like this, I find that the best results come from using a telephoto lens from a distance to ‘flatten’ the apparent distance between the subject and the background. When the sun is rising, it looks bigger and more dramatic.

Here is a behind-the-scenes view of the session:

Behind the Scenes: Shooting Mario's Tree

Behind the Scenes: Shooting Mario’s Tree

In the foreground is my camera rig, and in the distance is the rest of the gang, talking near our 4WD while I photograph Mario’s Tree.  Some plains game can also be seen scattered around the horizon.

Soon after wrapping up the landscape shoot and heading in a north-westerly direction, we encountered a few hyenas, one of which was eating the head and leg from a zebra, which the hyenas had probably stolen from lions overnight.

We stayed to watch the hyenas eating, where I also captured a portrait of a spotted hyena in isolation.

Portrait of a Spotted Hyena

Portrait of a Spotted Hyena

Sometimes hyenas can be difficult to photograph, especially when there is food around, as they tend not to stay still for very long.

During our time with the hyenas, we also spotted a pair of jackals mating.  At one point, the male appeared to get ‘stuck’ whilst attached to the female, and it made for some very awkward and uncomfortable moments.

Eventually, the jackals managed to separate after the deed had been done.

After those amusing moments, we ventured further north-west in the direction of the Mara River, encountering a herd of giraffes feeding on tall acacia trees.

Very close to the giraffes was an excitable male wildebeest, who was very much interested in mating, and rounding up all of his females for his mating pleasure.

It was amusing and fascinating to watch as he constantly chased the females around, trying to herd them and occasionally mount them.

Some herds of wildebeest, such as this herd, are territorial and do not move between Kenya and Tanzania as part of the Great Migration.

These animals tend to stay in the same area, and with the grass being as short as it was, despite the recent wet season concluding, the conditions are ideal, and the wildebeest do not need to migrate.

Gimme Some Action

Gimme Some Action

The male was constantly grunting and trying to herd and mate with the females.

While we were there, he did not have much luck, as the females were not interested, with some of them running away.  Despite this, the male kept trying to round them up.

After spending some time watching the male wildebeest having a difficult morning, we headed sharply north, and further towards the northern part of the conservancy.

Along one of the Mara River tributaries, we encountered a pair of saddle-billed storks.

This was the first time we had encountered these large and colourful storks.

They tend to be wary and evasive, so getting close enough to capture a clean and pleasing head-and-shoulders shot was not an easy task, but we were able to capture such images using longer focal lengths.

Female Saddle-Billed Stork

Female Saddle-Billed Stork

Visually, the difference between the female and the male is the eyes.  The female has yellow irises, whereas the male as black irises.

I concentrated on photographing the more visually appealing female.

We spent a good 25 minutes with the saddle-billed storks, which were challenging at times to photograph, as they were more interested in keeping their distance and foraging for food than posing for photographers.  How rude.

A short distance north-west of the saddle-billed storks, we encountered a juvenile short-tailed eagle (also known as a bateleur) on the ground, feeding on a warthog leg which had probably been stolen from another predator such as a lion or a cheetah.

Soon enough, the eagle launched into the air and landed in a nearby tree.

Francis moved the vehicle and positioned us to capture a clean image of the eagle, which was posed very nicely on a branch with some dark foliage in the background.

Here is one of the images I captured as the juvenile short-tailed eagle perched regally on an exposed branch:

Juvenile Short-Tailed Eagle

Juvenile Short-Tailed Eagle

With the sightings we had enjoyed of both the saddle-billed storks and the juvenile short-tailed eagle, once again the Maasai Mara had presented us with great opportunities for capturing pleasing images of birds.

The morning was still young, so after spending ten to fifteen minutes photographing the juvenile short-tailed eagle, we continued on, this time in a north-easterly direction towards the Mara River.

We soon we arrived at a distinctively sharp bend in the Mara River, slightly south-west of Mara North Airstrip.

This V-shaped section of the river would be our breakfast stop for the morning.  Upon arrival, we hopped out of the vehicle to stretch our legs, while Francis prepared our breakfast of muffins, fruit, yoghurt, coffee and tea.

This particular location of the river afforded a nice view of the numerous hippos in the water below.  Despite the wet season having recently ended, the water level was surprisingly low.

After some food, a stretch and a break, we climbed back into the 4WD and headed south, spotting some more giraffes and grabbing a few images.

What we did not know is that a few minutes later, we were going to see something special.

Within five minutes, we had the pleasure of encountering Amani and her three cubs for the third time in two days.

They had successfully hunted and taken down a Thomson’s gazelle minutes before we arrived, and were in the process of killing it as we watched.

I captured frame after frame, and switched to video mode, recording footage of the gazelle meeting its end in order to provide the cheetahs with a much-needed meal.

Fast Food

Fast Food

We had missed the hunt, chase and capture by a matter of only a minute or two, but the tommie was still alive and struggling when we arrived, and while it is never easy to see an animal perish, it is a necessary part of nature, and for cheetahs, a success amongst a high rate of failures.

Cheetahs hunt, kill and feed out in the open, and very often lose their meals to hyenas and other predators.

For this reason, cheetahs must devour their meals as quickly as possible, as they are very vulnerable whilst feeding on the open savannah, and other predators very quickly discover the presence of a potential meal and will chase cheetahs away.

For us, this was the first time we had seen a kill taking place in Africa.  While the death of an animal is never a pleasure and can be quite distressing to witness, it is the law of the land, and cheetahs, the smallest and most vulnerable of Africa‘s big cats, need to feed in order to survive and keep the endangered species going.

This was a magnificent sighting, and numerous safari vehicles had descended upon the area.

We spent over 40 minutes with Amani and her cubs as they killed their prey, feasted quickly, cleaned and groomed, and then settled for a rest under the cover of a croton bush after their high-impact activity.

During the sighting, I was fortunate to photograph and video two of Amani’s sub-adult cheetah cubs cleaning each other after feasting on the Thomson’s gazelle Amani had caught for them.

Feline Tenderness

Feline Tenderness

Predatory cats can exhibit such fierceness and aggression, but also have an amazing capacity for tenderness as they groom and bond.

This was our third and final sighting of Amani and her cubs in the space of two days in the Mara North Conservancy, but from what I have seen since we last saw them, they are doing quite well, and I hope they continue to do well in the harsh environment that is Africa.

We left Amani and her cubs to rest, and headed north a short distance, where we countered one of the ‘Ugly Five’: a marabou stork.  This was another ‘first’ for us, as we had not seen one before.

Marabou Stork

Marabou Stork

I captured a few images of the stork before we turned around to head back towards camp.

Along the way we spotted a jackal resting, and then headed further south-east, coming across yet another ‘first’.

We had gone looking for a female leopard who had been spotted in the area.

Unfortunately we did not find the leopard, but unusually we did encounter this male reedbuck, who was highly alert and wary of our presence.

Reedbuck on Alert

Reedbuck on Alert

We saw him around the other side of this bush where he was taking cover, but fortunately by the time we moved around to the other side, he remained in place and posed nicely as we captured images.

Soon enough, we arrived back at camp where we had lunch.  Being the second day, we still had the camp to ourselves, so we enjoyed a nice lunch, and I took care of my usual post-drive housekeeping.

We had decided to head back out into the plains at around 3pm or so, and before too long, it was time to depart.  We met Francis, climbed into the 4WD and set off in a southerly direction towards the Offbeat part of the conservancy, named after Offbeat Mara Camp, which is located in this very lush area.

We spotted and photographed a common eland, which was nicely positioned in the open, before continuing south.

Somewhere along the way, Francis noticed something on the ground while we were driving around the Offbeat area.  He stopped the vehicle, got out, and retrieved an Apple iPhone!

Someone had unfortunately lost an expensive smartphone whilst in the area.  We were naturally worried, and figured that perhaps it belonged to someone from Offbeat Mara Camp, which was nearby.

We had seen a few other vehicles in the area, and thought that one of the guests had dropped the phone without realising it, perhaps while moving around in the vehicle or while putting on or taking off a jacket.  It can happen so easily.

We tried to make contact with the other vehicles in the area, and after some time had passed, we fortunately found the rightful owner in one of the other vehicles.

The owner was a girl from Australia, who, as we found out when returning her smartphone, did not even know she had lost it, as she thought it was back at camp.  I told her that she must be the luckiest person in Africa, as the chance of finding a lost smartphone in the Mara is very slim.

After that fortunate reunion, we continued on our way around the Offbeat area, soon enough encountering the Offbeat Pride of lions for the first time.

Having seen cheetahs during the morning and lions during afternoon drive, the day was still getting better, and the rest of our afternoon/evening game drive was spent in the company of the Offbeat Pride of lions.

A moody sky was the background, which made for some pleasing photography.

Here, after sunset and as the darkness of night increasingly set in, one of the lionesses rests, while nearby the cubs and other young pride lions were becoming more active.

Early Evening Leisure

Early Evening Leisure

During our time with the pride, the sky turned a magical pink and purple colour, so in between capturing images of the Offbeat Pride lions playing and becoming more active as the darkness of night approached, I captured an image of a distant cluster of trees set against the rich colours of the twilight sky.

Magical Offbeat

Magical Offbeat

The Offbeat area is beautiful, and spending it with lions and seeing some intense colour in the sky was a very pleasant way to finish the day.

A short time later, it was time to leave the lions to their business and return to camp for dinner, drinks and debriefing.

Sunday, 2nd June, 2019 had been a fantastic second day in the Mara, with a wide variety of wildlife, and numerous first-time experiences, including a fantastic sighting of a cheetah kill and subsequent feast, sightings of three new-to-us birds (a juvenile short-tailed eagle, saddle-billed storks and a marabou stork), a few animals who were feeling frisky and taking action, a reedbuck, and our first sighting of the Offbeat Pride of lions.

Additionally, we had been able to reunite a lost smartphone with its owner.

It was only our second day, and already we had seen and photographed so much.  The Mara did not disappoint, and we were still in the infancy of this trip.

Stay tuned for our adventures on day three.