Tag Archives: Evening

Magical Light in Perth

Looking back, I have unfortunately neglected to write much here for the second half of 2018. Photographically, 2018 was not a big year.

However, 2019 started off very nicely with a trip to Western Australia, in which we were based in Perth.

This was a first-time experience, and naturally, I had a list of subjects and places I wanted to photograph.

In our short time, I did not capture all of the images I wanted to captured, but I did tick a few off the list, and came away with some rare images.

On our second day, we did some tourist activities in the city, one of which was a visit to Kings Park.  It was one of the locations on my list.  In fact, for that day, I had planned to shoot Elizabeth Quay at twilight; but I also wanted to shoot the war memorial in Kings Park at golden hour, followed by a cityscape at twilight.

Kings Park offers sublime elevated views of Perth, and may just be the only major Australian city which offers an elevated view from a publicly accessible place.

After our first visit of that day to Kings Park, I changed my mind about the plan, and decided that we should return and execute the photography plan there on that day.

As the afternoon wore on, the cloud increased, and the light became very glary, flat and dull.  My hopes for golden hour were fading, but I figured we would stick around anyway, as there was still the potential for a moody twilight.

Late in the afternoon — actually, technically evening — some golden light started to appear on the buildings across the water.

I set up my rig and played the waiting game.

Within a matter of minutes, the light started getting interesting, and before too long, there was an amazing glow of golden light on buildings.

This is what I saw:

Gold Rush

Gold Rush

Despite the horrible cloudy sky, the cloud in the west had not completely obscured the sun, and as a result, some intense light struck the city.

The combination of a darker, cloud-laden sky in the east as the intense warmth of the sun shone through from the west, made for an amazing sight.

The next image I captured showed a blend of golden light, plus the beginning of the more intense warm colours as the sun inched its way closer to the horizon.

Picture-Perfect Perth

Picture-Perfect Perth

Later, just after sunset, the light became really interesting.  A glow of pinks, purples and reds immersed the entire city in intensely rich light.

I was in paradise.  This was the spectacle which had unfolded:

Best of the West

Best of the West

Light like this is so rare.  It really is the stuff of postcards.  I have only seen conditions like this on a few occasions, and rarely am I in the right place at the right time.

On this day, I was, and I captured the magnificence of light which is not only amazing in a photographic image, but exceedingly pleasant to watch with one’s own eyes.

A little while later, this magical pink glow gave way to the onset of twilight, and I completed the sequence of images.

Here is the result:

Perth by Night

Perth by Night

What a magical afternoon for photography.

Earlier in the afternoon, the conditions looked decidedly atrocious, and if we were somewhere else and not already committed to the shoot, I would have likely decided not to bother, because the light was terrible.

What I did not know was that it was a blessing in disguise.  The conditions were ideal; I just did not know it at the time, as we had restricted visibility of the western sky from where we were positioned.

In one session, the sky went from dull grey to intensely golden, and then to intensely pink and red, followed by gold and blue as evening fell.

What a shoot.  Conditions like this are rare, but this was the one occasion on which the big fish did not get away.

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My New Canon EF 24mm f/1.4L II USM: Ideal for Cityscapes

Last week, I decided to buy a Canon EF 24mm f/1.4L II USM lens.

It was a lens I had entertained — but not seriously — adding to my rig.

Until the addition of this lens, my two wide lenses consisted of my Canon EF 14mm f/2.8L II USM  and Canon EF 35mm f/1.4L USM.

While I love a wide vista, sometimes 14mm is just too wide.  I never thought I would say so, but alas, it is true.

On the other hand, 35mm can sometimes be too long.

Twice in the past 12 months I have needed a focal length in between 14mm and 35mm, but did not have a lens of that focal length.

I have barely owned my Canon EF 24mm f/1.4L II USM for a week, and I have used it on two separate twilight cityscape shoots.

So far, the 24mm focal length is proving to be very useful for cityscapes — particularly when shooting skylines across the water from a distance.  With a wider lens, the skyline can shrink into a vast expanse of sky and water; and with a longer lens, the framing can be just a bit too tight, whereby there is not quite enough sky.

My first shoot, on the same day I bought the lens, resulted in the following image:

Lavender Bay on a Summer Night

Lavender Bay on a Summer Night

This particular location does not seem to be hugely popular for cityscapes, but it was something different, and the 24mm focal length was absolutely perfect for this composition.

My second shoot with the new lens was last night.

After a few lazy days at home, I felt the need to get out for a photoshoot.

I decided to re-visit Mrs Macquarie’s Point.  The last time I photographed Sydney from this location was just over eight years ago.

Mrs Macquarie's View

Mrs Macquarie’s View

From this view, the skyline has not changed a great deal, but there are some buildings which did not exist in my previous image.

For this image, I opted for a wider focal length, and waited for the rich blue light of twilight to emerge after sunset.

I am enjoying the field of view this new lens provides.  Not having used the 24mm focal length for quite a while, it made for a nice change, and has been quite suitable so far for the images I have captured with it.

I am hoping to use it more next week, but I really need to invest in the NiSi filter holder which will fit this lens, as I need to be able to use my grads and ND filters with it.

Twilight Delight

The view of Sydney‘s skyline from the western side of Darling Harbour is always a beautiful spectacle as the evening twilight descends.

I have photographed it before, and I will photograph it again.

This time, I captured a view of that same skyline from the south-western corner of Cockle Bay, right outside the new International Convention Centre.

Twilight Delight

Twilight Delight

The angle is different to what I have captured before, and now depicts the completed skyscrapers at Barangaroo to the far left of the frame.

This place is always a pleasure to visit and photograph.

Milson’s Point View

A view of the Sydney Harbour Bridge from Milson’s Point at twilight.

Milson's Point View

Milson’s Point View

This year I have decided to make more of an effort to get out and shoot regularly.

For this most recent weeknight shoot (my third of 2017), I decided to re-visit the Sydney Harbour Bridge, which I rarely photograph any more.

The last time I captured a serious image here was in 2005!

So, here it is: the iconic bridge for which Sydney is famous.

Re-Visiting a Scene Six Years Later

During the week, I had the unusual opportunity to shoot a twilight cityscape.

It is not something I tend to do very often, but circumstance created the opportunity, which I seized, including a visit to a few of the big city camera stores.

I figured we would afterwards head over to Darling Harbour for some dinner, followed by a twilight cityscape in the area.

The image I had in mind was one I had shot before, but I did not mind re-visiting it, particularly with my new Canon EF 14mm f/2.8L II USM lens, which I was itching to use again after the previous week’s photoshoot in the city.

Here is the image I captured on this most recent outing:

Summer Night in the City

Summer Night in the City

Whilst having dinner very close to this scene earlier in the night, I recalled shooting a summer twilight in the same area some years ago. As it turned out, it was on the exact day (the 19th of January) in 2011 on which I shot a similar image.

This was the image I captured six years earlier:

City Lights and City Nights

City Lights and City Nights

It was not my intention to shoot the same scene (the composition, angle and position are somewhat different), and nor did I realise at first that the date was the same date I last shot this scene.

Sometimes strange co-incidences happen, and this was one of them.

Otherwise, it was nice to be out shooting again, particularly as I can go for months without picking up a camera.  Having a new lens certainly acts as a motivator, and I will endeavour this year to get out and about far more than I have done over the past several years.

Re-visiting a Six-Year-Old Brisbane Cityscape

On a wet and cold Sunday, I decided to re-visit a six-year old image and process it quite differently.

Firstly, here is the result:

Brisbane City from Kangaroo Point

Brisbane City from Kangaroo Point

In this version, the distortion has been corrected, and the contrast is much less aggressive.

As a point of comparison, here is the original version:

Brisbane City from Kangaroo Point

Brisbane City from Kangaroo Point

Naturally the perspective correction resulted in the loss of some subject matter — notably a building on the right side which has been completely eliminated from the new version of the image.

If I were to shoot the same image again, I would ensure that I would keep the axis of the lens parallel to the ground to avoid introducing perspective distortion in the first place; but otherwise I am pleased with the new version of this image.

Rainy Riverside

On our first night in London for a long time, we headed to Tower Bridge, where I had intended to shoot the bridge in the royal blue twilight light.

The weather had other ideas. As the darkness crept in, so did the rain, and it drizzled relentlessly as we cowered under the barely-adequte shelter outside London’s City Hall.

Earlier, I did manage to land a shot adjacent to The Scoop, looking west along the riverside.

Rainy Riverside

Rainy Riverside

In the distance can be seen The Shard, one of London’s newer buildings, which affords stunning views of London.

The London skyline has changed a lot since my previous trip in 2000, but the weather can still be quite miserable!