Tag Archives: Clouds

Precarious Position: First Seascape of 2018

This image of Turimetta Beach was captured during my first seascape session in nearly a year, and this was the first time I have returned to Turimetta since 2012.

Precarious Position

Precarious Position

The conditions were a lot more dangerous than this image would suggest, with a strong south-easterly wind, medium-to-large swell and an incoming tide.

Large waves were crashing near this small part of exposed rock shelf and causing splashes and surges which made standing here dangerous.  I had to be quick about composing and capturing images in between sets of larger waves.

It was good to be near the ocean again, but having been out of the seascaping scene for quite some time, this morning’s shoot had its challenges.

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Brisbane and South-East Queensland Visit – 2017

Late in 2017, we headed to Brisbane and south-east Queensland for the first time since 2013.

It was high time to visit Dave and Lea, and engage in some photography, tomfoolery and shiraz consumption.

On our first full day, we decided to head south-west to Queen Mary Falls, as there had been some recent rain in the Gold Coast area, and there was predicted cloud cover, which made waterfall photography ideal.

Our first stop was at Daggs Falls, where an observation platform provided a great view.  Unfortunately, the platform was very prone to vibrations, which made shooting long exposures with a 200mm lens and ten-stop ND filter somewhat impossible.

We drove up the road for a few minutes and got to Queen Mary Falls, which had a much more stable observation platform.  This time, I used my 14mm lens to capture the vast expanse of the scenery and the high view.

Long Way Down

Long Way Down

After we had finished shooting, we decided it was time for a late lunch.  Heading north-east for around five minutes, we happened across the Spring Creek Mountain Café, which offers a very pleasant view of the Scenic Rim.

While waiting for our lunch at an outside table, I took advantage of the light and cloud conditions over the valley, and captured this view.

Spring Creek Mountain

Spring Creek Mountain

The plan for the same day was to visit Brisbane‘s iconic Story Bridge for a twilight shoot.  The last time I photographed the Story Bridge was in 2008, and it was time for a new look at it, applying the experience and gear I have acquired since I last shot it.

The bridge is often photographed from Wilson Outlook Reserve, high up on the cliffs to the east.

This time, we decided to venture down onto the Brisbane River Walk below and try a different vantage point, which gave us a lower angle, allowing the reflections of the lights in the water to appear much more prominently.

During the session, the bridge put on an ever-changing show of multi-coloured lights, which created a nice contrast to the blue and cloudy night sky.

Story of Colour

Story of Colour

On the topic of the sky, the clouds were somewhat annoying and detracted from the image I had pictured, but it was what it was, and I had to make the best of the conditions at the time we were there.

After our shoot concluded, we walked to New Farm and stopped in an Italian restaurant for a late dinner before making the drive north-west to Cedar Creek.

The next day, the plan was to head out for an afternoon landscape shoot during golden hour.  This time, Dave and I headed out on our own.

We decided, given all the driving the day before, to remain in the local vicinity, and we threw around a few ideas.  We figured we would look for a view of the mountains in the area such that the sun would be behind us.

Driving around, we ended up at Mount Pleasant, but the scenes we visited just were not right, so we continued on, and this time headed up Mount Mee.

While driving north along Mount Mee Road, Dave spotted an interesting tree on the right at the junction with Sellin Road.

We stopped and headed over to the eastern side of the road to photograph the tree, which also had some grazing cows lingering nearby.

The light was warm, as it was quite late in the afternoon, but not quite warm enough for what we had in mind.  However, the light was still decent enough, so we snapped away as the cows grazed.

Here is what I captured:

High Steaks

High Steaks

For this image, and the image I was to shoot later in the day, I used my Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM lens.  Now, this lens was not one I bought to shoot landscapes, and I rarely ever use a telephoto lens for landscapes, much preferring the wide vista provided by an ultra-wide lens; however, from where we were standing, the 200mm focal length was just right, and provided a nice amount of compression.

After we had finished shooting at this spot, we headed west along Sellin Road, and spotted a lone tree we had photographed at dawn back in 2010.  To our surprise, there was now a large house now on the property, close to Sellin Road.  We could still see the tree further up the paddock in the distance.

Here are the stand-out images I captured of the ‘ Mount Mee Tree‘ in 2010:

Dawn on Mount Mee

Dawn on Mount Mee

Tree on Mee

Tree on Mee

We continued westward, and found some lovely side-lighting htting the lush green grasses down the ravine, but compositionally, there was not much on offer; so, we turned around and headed east.

I was beginning to think that we may not find much at all, and I pointed out that one really needs to scout and plan a location, which, we clearly had not done.

However, heading further east to where we had photographed the cows, I spotted a lovely, large tree down a valley to our left.  After driving past it, we swung back around and pulled up, with this location to be our final location for the day, in which we would photograph this beautiful tree in the rich and warm golden hour light which would greet us a little later.

I quickly found my composition, again using my Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM lens.  The view I found from the spot where I perched myself also contained some lush, long green grasses in the foreground, which I purposefully kept in the frame.  I liked the extra interest, as well as the framing device, it provided.

From then, it was a waiting game.

Once the light became even warmer, we snapped away.  Dave was capturing all sorts of images of different subjects in the area, from varying positions.  I remain focused on the tree.  That was my image, and I was not interested in anything else.

After waiting for the right light, here is the image I shot:

Glowing Tree

Glowing Tree

After the lovely light had disappeared, we headed back to Samford to collect some cows (of the non-grazing variety) and fermented grape juice for dinner at the house.

Thus, my photography for this trip was completed.

During our stay, Dave and I decided to compare our 200mm lenses.  He owns a Canon EF 200mm f/1.8L USM (a legendary and relatively rare lens, with only 8,000 having been built), and I own a Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM, which effectively replaced the 200/1.8L some 20 years after it was introduced.

We lined them up for a ‘family portrait’, and Dave captured an image of the two lenses side-by-side.  Later during the visit, we also staged a semi-scientific shoot, with a foam rubber dinosaur as the subject.  We photographed the dinosaur with both lenses, using the widest apertures available on both, as well as the widest aperture common to both.

Upon inspecting the resulting images, there is not a great deal of difference in sharpness between the two lenses.  Both deliver outstanding results.

All in all, it was a fun trip, and while photographically the conditions were not super exciting, I did manage to capture a few pleasing images along the way.

Upward View of Barangaroo

On the day I bought my new Canon EF 14mm f/2.8L II lens, I had planned a shoot for that evening.

Just before Christmas, we were around the King Street and Barangaroo area, and it was the first time I had seen the new skyscrapers since development concluded.

Looking up, I spotted some interestiong compositions, looking towards the sky, with the sleek and sharp lines of the skyscrapers forming the contrasting subject.  I captured some quick reference shots with my phone’s camera.  It was a place to which I wanted to return at twilight, for a proper photoshoot.

On the evening of 12 January, 2017, I achieved what I set out to achieve.

This ultra-wide view of the new skyscrapers at Barangaroo is my first serious image captured with my new Canon EF 14mm f/2.8L II USM lens.

Barangaroo Towers at Twilight

Barangaroo Towers at Twilight

I had purchased the lens merely a few hours before I shot this scene, and after a nice dinner, we headed to Barangaroo, where I had planned to shoot some quirky architectural images during tblue hour.

I am pleased with both the lens, and the images I captured during this summer twilight at Sydney‘s newest entertainment precinct.

After shooting this image, I re-composed.

Here is a view along Mercantile Walk in Barangaroo, west of the Sydney CBD, showing the towering skycrapers which are now the tallest in Sydney.

Mercantile Walk

Mercantile Walk

This image was captured with the ultra-wide 14mm focal length, which depicts an expansive view from the ground to the sky.

As the night wore on, I captured my final view a little further north of my original location.

To the Sky

To the Sky

This series of images signals for me new photographic study, which I had wanted to commence quite some time ago, but never got around to doing due to life being, well, life.

A new lens purchase and a recent visit to an excellent photographic location was what it took to finally inspire me to embark upon a series of striking architectural images of Sydney‘s skyscrapers, using an ultra-wide lens and extremely quirky, distortion-laden angles.

I am looking forward to exploring this style of photography more, and my new lens has certainly provided some much-needed inspiration.

Tančící Dům at Twilight

Apologies for my lack of updates over the last few months.  I have not been shooting much at all.  I have shot a few images, and published some older images which were worth a visit.

In the mean time, here’s a new image from a mid-year shoot.

A view of Tančící Dům (the Dancing House) in Prague, at twilight.

Tančící Dům at Twilight

Tančící Dům at Twilight

This is a slightly different composition to my earlier image of this unique building.

Here, more of the intersecting roads can be seen, and despite outward appearances, it is not as deserted as it looks.

It was a matter of timing to avoid cars and trams; but a careful look will reveal the streak of a car’s tail lights as the vehicle passed through my frame.

Views of Prague at Twilight

It is hard to believe, but it has been over a month since our trip to Prague.

While it was a short European getaway for only a few days, photographically, it was very productive and rewarding, and I certainly landed a few pleasing images in that short time.

Life has been quite busy since then, and I have unfortunately neglected to post about some of my images; so, below are the two images I captured on our first twilight in Prague.

Charles Bridge by Night

Charles Bridge by Night

From a photographer’s viewpoint, no trip to Prague would be complete without capturing an image of the iconic Charles Bridge at night.

The Charles Bridge (Karlův most) is a bridge in gothic architectural style, which was named after the esteemed King Charles IV.  It runs across the Vlatva from the Old Town to the Lesser Town, and is major route to Prague Castle up on the hill, adjacent to St Vitus Cathedral.

In summer, during the day, and indeed for much of the night, Charles Bridge is crammed with tourists and street merchants selling all manner of souvenirs.

Here is a view along Charles Bridge towards the Lesser Town on the other side, and Prague Castle and St Vitus Cathedral in the distance.

Praha Twilight

Praha Twilight

We had encountered this location earlier during the day on a four-hour walking tour of Prague, and I decided that it would be a good location for a shoot at twilight.

Despite the hoardes of tourists in the area, this easily accessible spot allows for a fairly uninterrupted view along the north side of Charles Bridge, plus the still reflections of the shoreline on the Vlatva.

Dancing House, Prague

Prague’s famous Dancing House was one of sights I wanted to see and photograph.

I planned to photograph the Dancing House on our last night in Prague, so we headed 1.2km south of our hotel, where I positioned myself for the image I wanted, once the light was right.

Here is the image I sought out to capture:

Dancing House

Dancing House

This unusual, modern building starkly contrasts with the surrounding architecture, and certainly makes for an interesting image.

I am pleased that I had the chance to both see and photograph the Dancing House in ideal blue hour light.

Vítejte v Praze (Welcome to Prague)

We have arrived in Prague, and spent our first day wandering around.

The day began with a 5am awakening as usual.  We decided to take advantage of the serenity of the dawn hours in a European city and wander out to the Charles Bridge, which is a five-minute walk from the Charles Bridge Palace, where we are staying.

The morning was cloudy and dull, and indeed, it had rained the previous night before we arrived at the airport.

At any rate, it was worth wandering around to see what we could find, and I captured a few images.

Incidentally, the last image I captured from the Charles Bridge was the most compelling of the series.  This is it:

Vítejte v Praze

Vítejte v Praze

This image was captured at 6:22am.  While the Charles Bridge, and indeed Prague itself, is extremely busy during European high season, this time of the morning was quiet, but there were still numerous photographers and tourists dotted along the bridge — certainly nothing like the chaos going on there right now.

This view looks westward toward the Little Quarter (or Lesser Town), and was taken not far from the end of the bridge.  The main feature past the arch is the gothic Little Quarter Bridge Tower.  On the far right is St Vitus Cathedral, adjacent to Prague Castle, both of which we visited this afternoon.

Despite the drab light, I am quite pleased with this image — it certainly came out better than I expected, and I love the cobblestones on the bridge leading towards the distinctly Eastern European architecture.

So far, from what we have seen of Prague, it is a beautiful city.  To its detriment is the crowds and the tacky tourist stuff everywhere, which starkly clashes with the old-world charm Prague otherwise has.

Just from the many hours of walking around Prague today, there are so many photographic opportunities; but as we are only here for a few days, I will not even scratch the surface of what Prague has to offer, but culturally and photographically.

Tonight, after dinner, I am heading back out to shoot some twilight views of Prague.  Hopefully I will capture something special.