Tag Archives: Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM

Lenses: Primes vs. Zooms

Introduction

In the photography world, the topic of prime lenses vs. zoom lenses is one of those enduring debates.

As someone who has used both types of lenses extensively over the years, I will offer my views both for and against both types.

Let me preface by saying that I made a conscious choice to use prime lenses only; but before explaining why, this article will examine the strengths and weakness of both lens types.

Photography is all about trade-offs, and it is no different with lenses.

 

Prime Lenses

A prime lens, otherwise known as a fixed focal lens, is a lens which has only one focal length.

 

Advantages of Prime Lenses

Because a prime lens is optically designed for a specific focal length, it is therefore specialised.  It does one thing, and it does that one thing well.

With a prime lens, it can be the case that the optical formula is simpler, and therefore the types of adverse optical effects the optical design needs to counter, are reduced in both number and nature.  The use of less lens elements or groups of lens elements contributes to this ability.

Prime lenses are generally (but not always) sharper than their zoom lens counterparts at equivalent focal lengths.  Depending on the lenses compared, the sharpness difference can be substantial, or barely noticeable.

Zoom lenses have come a long way in recent years, with their sharpness in some cases able to equal or exceed the sharpness of prime lenses at equivalent focal lengths.

Newer lenses may introduce optical designs and lens coating processes which are superior to those of older lenses.

On the other hand, some quite old lenses are legendary for their sharpness despite substantial development as digital photography has become widespread.

Prime lenses tend to be available in wider apertures than zoom lenses, with f/2.8 commonly being the widest aperture in which zoom lenses have been available.  In recent years, zoom lenses have become available with maximum apertures of f/2 and even f/1.8.  Sigma in particular has been at the forefront of lens innovation and breaking of traditional boundaries.

In the Canon EOS/EF product lineup, the lens with the widest aperture ever released was the Canon EF 50mm f/1.0L USM, which has long been discontinued, and which is somewhat rare and expensive, earning it a position as a ‘cult’ lens.  Currently, the widest aperture Canon offers is f/1.2, in both a 50mm lens and an 85mm lens.

Incidentally, despite its cult status, the Canon EF 50mm f/1.0L USM is notoriously soft at f/1, and produces a strange rainbow effect in the bokeh in some situations.  This lens is more desirable for its specifications than its abilities.

In the 1960s, Canon offered an S-mount 50mm f/0.95 lens.

The f/1.4, f/1.8 and f/2 apertures are common maximum apertures amongst prime lenses.

Generally speaking, lenses with very wide or very long focal lengths tend to be somewhat limited in the widest apertures in which they are available.  This limitation is due to physics, in that it requires a lot of glass — particularly with long focal lengths — to produce a lens with a wide aperture.  This increases the optical complexity, production cost, size and weight, all of which are inherently negative attributes from both the manufacturer’s perspective as well as the end user’s perspective.

Because prime lenses are generally available in wider apertures than zoom lenses covering the same focal lengths, this makes them advantageous and desirable on several fronts.

The first benefit is low light ability.  Lenses with wider apertures can more easily capture images in low light.  This means that a faster shutter speed and/or lower ISO sensitivity rating can be used, which has the benefit of hand-holdability and a cleaner image.

The ability to use a faster shutter speed is particularly important when capturing movement — specifically when there is the desire to freeze subject movement.  It is difficult to achieve this objective by using lenses with narrower apertures.  There are ways around this, but there are invariably trade-offs.  Increasing the ISO sensitivity rating increases noise, and using artificial lighting is not always practical or even possible.

The second benefit is bokeh, the Japanese word for the quality of the out-of-focus highlights.

A lens with a wider aperture means that it is possible to achieve a narrower depth of field, which obfuscates the background with pleasing blur, and isolates the subject from the background.  Both effects are visually appealing, particularly for portraiture.

Depth of field is, of course, affected by not only the aperture, but the focal length and the distance between the camera and the subject.  The extent to which the background is blurred is also affected by the distance between the subject and the background.

The third benefit of lenses with wider apertures is the ability to autofocus in low light.  Modern lenses with electronic apertures leave the diaphragm wide open when composing and focusing, and then close it down to the user- or camera-specified f/stop when exposing.

This means that even when shooting at f/11 with an f/1.4 lens, the lens’s aperture is opened to f/1.4 when composing and focusing.  This results in more accurate, reliable autofocus.

One final benefit of prime lenses is a reduction in size and weight, compared to zooms offering the same focal length.

While this can be the case, it is not always the case.

The Canon EF 35mm f/1.4L USM lens is physically large and heavy relative to its focal length.  It is physically longer than the Canon EF 85mm f/1.2L II USM lens, which itself is a monster of a lens, weighing over 1kg.

Other prime lenses are smaller and lighter than the general-purpose zoom lenses which provide the same focal lengths.

So, those are the advantages of prime lenses; but what are the disadvantages?

 

Disadvantages of Prime Lenses

For all the positive benefits prime lenses provide, they also come with some negative attributes.

As discussed in the previous paragraph, prime lenses can be larger and heavier than zoom lenses which provide the same focal lengths.

This is particularly true with longer lenses, such as those offering the 200mm or 300mm focal lengths.  Prime lenses in these focal lengths — even those not offering the widest apertures available in those focal lengths — can be larger and heavier than some zoom lenses which cover those focal lengths, albeit at narrower apertures.

A photographer who makes use of prime lenses may find that the size and weight increases, and this must be considered when travelling, as it does not take much effort to consume a lot of space or exceed airline cabin baggage weight restrictions.  Having carried large and heavy prime lenses to far away destinations, I am all too familiar with these challenges.

Cost is another consideration when using prime lenses instead of zoom lenses.

Some zoom lenses cover a broad range of focal lengths, and to cover a number of those focal lengths with prime lenses can mean not only an increase in the number of lenses one needs, but a higher cost, depending on the specifications of the lenses.

One general-purpose zoom lens can easily cover four, five or even six common focal lengths for which prime lenses are available, in a single package which costs and weighs less than a bag full of primes.

By far the most significant disadvantage of prime lenses is the lack of flexibility to change the framing.  With a prime lens, the only way to change the view of a subject is to move — or change lenses.  In some cases, this is not particularly problematic; but in other cases, there may be circumstances which limit or eliminate the ability to move.

Someone photographing action, such as wildlife, sports or performances, may not have the time to switch lenses.  These subjects are very time-dependent, and a moment missed can never be re-visited.

It may not be possible to move positions to change the view.  When photographing any of those above-mentioned subjects, you may be limited to the very position in which you happen to be, as it is not safe, practical or permissible to move closer to the subject, or further from the subject.  To that end, prime lenses can be quite limiting.

 

Zoom Lenses

A zoom lens, otherwise known as a variable focal lens, is a lens which offers a range of focal lengths, which can be changed by rotating a ring on the lens barrel.

 

Advantages of Zoom Lenses

Zoom lenses offer a number of advantages over prime lenses.

The most significant is the ability to change focal lengths without moving, or changing lenses.  As discussed in the preceding section on prime lenses, sometimes timing may be critical, or the shooting position may be fixed.

If one is shooting a subject which moves, an appropriate focal length can be selected by rotating the zoom ring in either direction to zoom in or out of the scene to achieve an ideal composition.

In addition to the often highly desired ability to change focal lengths easily, is the reduction in size and weight.

One zoom lens can easily cater for the focal lengths of five or six prime lenses.  This means that the size, weight, cost and quantity of lenses is significantly reduced.  In some situations, this can be essential, as well as desirable.

This can be advantageous for someone on a budget, or with limited ability or desire to carry a bag full of lenses.  Convenience is the result.

One other feature zoom lenses offer is the ability to introduce motion blur by zooming during exposure.  Admittedly, in my opinion, it is a gimmicky effect which has limited practical application; but occasionally, if done sparingly and with a suitable subject, the motion blur caused by zooming in or out during exposure can result in an interesting image, which no prime lens can capture.

What zoom lenses offer over primes is predominantly convenience.

Some people do not wish to change lenses, which in my own opinion defeats the purpose of investing in a camera system designed for the ability to change lenses; but in some situations, changing lenses is not practical or sensible.

So, what are the disadvantages of zoom lenses?

 

Disadvantages of Zoom Lenses

Naturally, zoom lenses come with disadvantages, too.  Remember, photography is all about trade-offs.

Image quality — particularly sharpness — is one of the attributes often cited as a disadvantage of zoom lenses.

One must be cautious when making claims about the sharpness of images captured with zoom lenses — specifically, less sharpness — as it is not quite so simple.

As described earlier, some zoom lenses can rival or exceed the sharpness provided by zoom lenses at identical focal lengths.  Modern zoom lenses have come a long way, and the current generation of professional-grade zoom lenses offers image sharpness which would satisfy all but the most fussy, pixel-peeping photographer.

In practical terms, very few people could look at an image captured with a modern, professional-grade zoom lens and identify, purely visually, that it was captured with a zoom lens.

Of course, not all zoom lenses offer outstanding image quality.

The challenge zoom lenses have, which prime lenses do not have, is the need to optically cater for a spectrum of focal lengths and associated optical characteristics.

Zoom lenses generally have more distortion than prime lenses, particularly at the widest and longest focal lengths provided in the lens.

The widest focal lengths tend to experience more pronounced barrel distortion; and conversely, at the longest focal lengths, pincushion distortion is not uncommon.

The broader the range of focal lengths a zoom lens offers, the more challenging it is to avoid adverse optical effects.

This is why professional-grade zoom lenses offer a narrower range of focal lengths than entry-level or mid-range zoom lenses.  Professional-grade zoom lenses typically do not exceed a zoom ratio of 3x.  Entry-level ‘super-zoom’ lenses can offer zoom ratios in double-digit territory.

The zoom ratio of a lens is calculated by dividing the longest focal length by the widest focal length.

A 24-70mm lens has a zoom ratio of 2.92 (ie, 70 divided by 24 equals 2.92 with rounding).

An 18-200mm lens has a zoom ratio of 11.1 (ie, 200 divided by 18 equals 11.1).

One of the other disadvantages of zoom lenses is the maximum aperture available.  Added to this is the fact that not all zoom lenses have a constant aperture across the range of focal lengths.

Until relatively recently, whether the aperture was constant or variable, zoom lenses did not offer a maximum aperture wider than f/2.8, and zoom lenses which could open to f/2.8 were typically professional-grade lenses, which cost a lot more than consumer-grade lenses offering similar focal lengths.

As discussed earlier, some lens manufacturers — notably Sigma — have recently offered zoom lenses with maximum apertures wider than f/2.8.  Major camera and lens manufacturers such as Canon and Nikon, at the time of writing, have still not yet offered a zoom lens with a maximum aperture wider than f/2.8.  Perhaps the third-party vendors, or even other major players, will challenge that and result in wider-aperture zooms becoming available.

Other than professional-grade zoom lenses, mid-range and entry-level zooms typically have variable apertures (eg, f/4-5.6).  This means that as the focal length increases, the maximum aperture decreases.  The main problem with this design is that if one is shooting at the widest aperture, and zooms in to a longer focal length, the exposure will need to be adjusted, as the aperture will automatically stop down as the focal length is increased.

With zoom lenses offering narrower apertures than prime lenses of an identical focal length, the ability to isolate the subject from the background is reduced.  It should be remembered, as discussed earlier, that depth of field is affected by more than aperture; but all else being equal, a narrower aperture results in a less blurred background.  Depending on the focal length, camera-to-subject distance, subject-to-background distance and aperture difference, the resulting background blur and subject isolation may not be substantially different.

 

My Choice of Lenses and Preference for Primes

As mentioned briefly in the introduction, I shoot with prime lenses only.  I have owned a number of zoom lenses over the years, up to the year 2017, when I offloaded my remaining zoom lens, which a prime lens replaced.

I have had zooms and primes for a long time.  When I bought my first SLR, I had a pair of cheap, slow kit zooms.  When I bought my first DSLR, I also had a kit zoom, and I bought a number of zooms over the years since.

I also bought and sold a number of prime lenses.

I owned a Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM lens for over nine years, and I extensively shot with it until early 2017.  According to my lens usage statistics, it is my most commonly used lens.

What I observed, and what my focal length usage per lens statistics confirm, is that the 16mm focal length was by far my most used focal length on that lens.  I used the lens like it was a prime, and I recall being on one shoot, disliking the composition, and then moving the tripod forward to re-compose.  It did not even occur to me to simply rotate the zoom ring!

Now, I like the 16mm focal length, and I already owned more primes than zooms, so perhaps it was two factors which unconsciously affected my behaviour.

In early 2017, as much as I liked my Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM, I decided that I wanted a wider focal length, and I wanted to move to a prime for my ultra-wide lens, so I replaced this lens with a Canon EF 14mm f/2.8L II USM.  More details about this lens change can be read here.

A few months later, I decided to replace my long-serving Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM with a Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM.  Like my 16-35/2.8L II, my 70-200/2.8L IS had brought me many pleasing images, and had travelled abroad on several occasions; but again, I wanted to move to a prime-only configuration, and gain an extra stop in the form of the lust-worthy 200/2L IS.  More details about this lens change can be read here.

Even more recently in 2018, with the addition of a Canon EF 24mm f/1.4L II USM lens (story here) which bridged the significant gap between my 16mm and 35mm lenses, I have covered all focal lengths I want, in prime lenses only.

While I had only two zoom lenses for a period of nine years, I made a rapid transition to exclusive use of prime lenses in 2017.

Why did I do this?

I like prime lenses.  I am used to using prime lenses, and ‘zooming with one’s feet’ is not something I find to be an obstacle.

I also like lenses with wide apertures, and primes give me that.

I like the look the use of a wide aperture provides, and I like the ability for low light to be of little or no challenge.

All of my lenses have the widest currently available apertures offered by Canon in those focal lengths.

While there are some excellent zoom lenses, the advantages zoom lenses provide are not necessary in my pursuits.  I do not need the convenience one or two lenses offers over six or seven lenses.

My photography is mostly planned.  I do not carry an SLR rig as a matter of course; I go out specifically to shoot, and I take the lenses I know from years of experience that I will need.

The use of prime lenses suits my planned, controlled and specific photography.

It just works for me, and I am very accustomed to it.

Sure, I sometimes end up with a heavier bag than other photographers may like, but for the images I seek, and the capability I want, I can work with this.

With my current array of primes and telephoto extenders, I now have 14mm at f/2.8, 24mm at f/1.4, 35mm at f/1.4, 85mm at f/1.2, 135mm at f/2, 189mm at f/2.8, 200mm at f/2, 270mm at f/4, 280mm at f/2.8, 300mm at f/2.8, 400mm at f/2.8, 420mm at f/4, 560mm at f/4, 600mm at f/5.6 and 800mm at f/5.6.

I cannot complain!

Where is the 50mm prime, you ask?  Not in my bag!

 

Conclusion

As this article has discussed, both prime lenses and zoom lenses have their advantages and disadvantages.

Both types of lenses have their place.

Some people, such as myself, choose to use prime lenses only, as they like the capability and specialisation primes offer over zooms.

Some people choose to use zoom lenses only, as they like the flexibility and convenience.

Some people — many, from what I have seen — like to use both, and therefore have the best of both worlds, with more flexibility being the key benefit.

There is an enormous range of high-quality primes and zooms available, and many of today’s zooms can rival or exceed the image quality traditionally provided by prime lenses.

It is all a matter of choice, based on the individual photographer’s needs and wants.

Hopefully this article has provided plenty of information about both lens types which will help people decide whether one type of lens, or both, is the most suitable choice for the job.

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Brisbane and South-East Queensland Visit – 2017

Late in 2017, we headed to Brisbane and south-east Queensland for the first time since 2013.

It was high time to visit Dave and Lea, and engage in some photography, tomfoolery and shiraz consumption.

On our first full day, we decided to head south-west to Queen Mary Falls, as there had been some recent rain in the Gold Coast area, and there was predicted cloud cover, which made waterfall photography ideal.

Our first stop was at Daggs Falls, where an observation platform provided a great view.  Unfortunately, the platform was very prone to vibrations, which made shooting long exposures with a 200mm lens and ten-stop ND filter somewhat impossible.

We drove up the road for a few minutes and got to Queen Mary Falls, which had a much more stable observation platform.  This time, I used my 14mm lens to capture the vast expanse of the scenery and the high view.

Long Way Down

Long Way Down

After we had finished shooting, we decided it was time for a late lunch.  Heading north-east for around five minutes, we happened across the Spring Creek Mountain Café, which offers a very pleasant view of the Scenic Rim.

While waiting for our lunch at an outside table, I took advantage of the light and cloud conditions over the valley, and captured this view.

Spring Creek Mountain

Spring Creek Mountain

The plan for the same day was to visit Brisbane‘s iconic Story Bridge for a twilight shoot.  The last time I photographed the Story Bridge was in 2008, and it was time for a new look at it, applying the experience and gear I have acquired since I last shot it.

The bridge is often photographed from Wilson Outlook Reserve, high up on the cliffs to the east.

This time, we decided to venture down onto the Brisbane River Walk below and try a different vantage point, which gave us a lower angle, allowing the reflections of the lights in the water to appear much more prominently.

During the session, the bridge put on an ever-changing show of multi-coloured lights, which created a nice contrast to the blue and cloudy night sky.

Story of Colour

Story of Colour

On the topic of the sky, the clouds were somewhat annoying and detracted from the image I had pictured, but it was what it was, and I had to make the best of the conditions at the time we were there.

After our shoot concluded, we walked to New Farm and stopped in an Italian restaurant for a late dinner before making the drive north-west to Cedar Creek.

The next day, the plan was to head out for an afternoon landscape shoot during golden hour.  This time, Dave and I headed out on our own.

We decided, given all the driving the day before, to remain in the local vicinity, and we threw around a few ideas.  We figured we would look for a view of the mountains in the area such that the sun would be behind us.

Driving around, we ended up at Mount Pleasant, but the scenes we visited just were not right, so we continued on, and this time headed up Mount Mee.

While driving north along Mount Mee Road, Dave spotted an interesting tree on the right at the junction with Sellin Road.

We stopped and headed over to the eastern side of the road to photograph the tree, which also had some grazing cows lingering nearby.

The light was warm, as it was quite late in the afternoon, but not quite warm enough for what we had in mind.  However, the light was still decent enough, so we snapped away as the cows grazed.

Here is what I captured:

High Steaks

High Steaks

For this image, and the image I was to shoot later in the day, I used my Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM lens.  Now, this lens was not one I bought to shoot landscapes, and I rarely ever use a telephoto lens for landscapes, much preferring the wide vista provided by an ultra-wide lens; however, from where we were standing, the 200mm focal length was just right, and provided a nice amount of compression.

After we had finished shooting at this spot, we headed west along Sellin Road, and spotted a lone tree we had photographed at dawn back in 2010.  To our surprise, there was now a large house now on the property, close to Sellin Road.  We could still see the tree further up the paddock in the distance.

Here are the stand-out images I captured of the ‘ Mount Mee Tree‘ in 2010:

Dawn on Mount Mee

Dawn on Mount Mee

Tree on Mee

Tree on Mee

We continued westward, and found some lovely side-lighting htting the lush green grasses down the ravine, but compositionally, there was not much on offer; so, we turned around and headed east.

I was beginning to think that we may not find much at all, and I pointed out that one really needs to scout and plan a location, which, we clearly had not done.

However, heading further east to where we had photographed the cows, I spotted a lovely, large tree down a valley to our left.  After driving past it, we swung back around and pulled up, with this location to be our final location for the day, in which we would photograph this beautiful tree in the rich and warm golden hour light which would greet us a little later.

I quickly found my composition, again using my Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM lens.  The view I found from the spot where I perched myself also contained some lush, long green grasses in the foreground, which I purposefully kept in the frame.  I liked the extra interest, as well as the framing device, it provided.

From then, it was a waiting game.

Once the light became even warmer, we snapped away.  Dave was capturing all sorts of images of different subjects in the area, from varying positions.  I remain focused on the tree.  That was my image, and I was not interested in anything else.

After waiting for the right light, here is the image I shot:

Glowing Tree

Glowing Tree

After the lovely light had disappeared, we headed back to Samford to collect some cows (of the non-grazing variety) and fermented grape juice for dinner at the house.

Thus, my photography for this trip was completed.

During our stay, Dave and I decided to compare our 200mm lenses.  He owns a Canon EF 200mm f/1.8L USM (a legendary and relatively rare lens, with only 8,000 having been built), and I own a Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM, which effectively replaced the 200/1.8L some 20 years after it was introduced.

We lined them up for a ‘family portrait’, and Dave captured an image of the two lenses side-by-side.  Later during the visit, we also staged a semi-scientific shoot, with a foam rubber dinosaur as the subject.  We photographed the dinosaur with both lenses, using the widest apertures available on both, as well as the widest aperture common to both.

Upon inspecting the resulting images, there is not a great deal of difference in sharpness between the two lenses.  Both deliver outstanding results.

All in all, it was a fun trip, and while photographically the conditions were not super exciting, I did manage to capture a few pleasing images along the way.

Re-Visiting Featherdale Wildlife Park

Early this year, we took a trip to Featherdale Wildlife Park for the first time, and photographed a number of animals and birds.

Having recently bought a new Canon EOS 5D Mark IV and a new Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM, I was keen to head back to Featherdale Wildlife Park to shoot with my new gear, and hopefully capture a pleasing image or two.

Normally I would take my Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS USM for a photoshoot involving wildlife, but I specifically wanted to shoot with my new 200mm lens, so I took that, plus my Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS USM and both the 1.4x and 2x tele-converters.

Throughout the half-day visit, I mostly shot with new 200mm lens, and occasionally used my 300mm lens.  I wanted to shoot wide-open and isolate my subjects from their mostly busy backgrounds.

We headed out on an extremely cold morning, and were amongst the first visitors to the park on that day.

Having photographed penguins there before, I naturally wanted to photograph them again.  Here is the stand-out image from the many penguin images I captured:

Profile of a Little Penguin

Profile of a Little Penguin

These creatures can be very difficult to photograph, as they constantly scurry around and often stand in front of annoying backgrounds.  Not so in this case, as I was able to isolate this penguin against his sandy surroundings.

As can be seen in this image, the Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM is very sharp, and produces very pleasing background blur.  Had the penguin been higher and further away from the background, the background blur would have been even creamier.

We had some warm morning light during our visit, and whilst wandering amongst the bird section, I spotted this white-browed woodswallow perched in the warmth of the sun.

White-Browed Woodswallow

White-Browed Woodswallow

Unfortunately the woodswallow is enclosed in a cage, and even when shooting wide-open at f/2 within close proximity to the cage, it was not possible to obliterate the pattern of the cage against the background.

Despite this annoyance, the lens has again shown itself to be a tack-sharp performer, capable of easily isolating a subject.

Earlier during the visit, I spotted a kookaburra sunning himself in a narrow sliver of sunlight on a branch.

Catching Some Rays

Catching Some Rays

For this image, needing more reach to fill the frame, I used my Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS USM and 1.4x tele-converter.  I have not used that lens for quite a while now, so it was good to give it another run.

It was an enjoyable — albeit cold — morning, and using my new gear was certainly enjoyable too.

Given the capabilties of the Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM, I am very much looking forward to using it in the near future for some portraiture.

My New Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM

This is my new Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM.

My New Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM

My New Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM

This is a lens I first tried in 2008.  It took nine years before I decided to buy one, and it is my third Canon EF super telephoto lens, joining its bigger brothers, the Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS USM and the Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS USM.

There is a bit of a story behind this lens.  I was meant to have it much sooner, except the lens which was dispatched from Canon Australia to my supplier disappeared. Canon had only one more in stock, which was no longer available by the time it was discovered that my lens vanished.

Consequently, a new lens needed to be ordered from Japan, which delayed the acqusition time.  Finally, it arrived, and here it is.

This year has seen some major gear changes in my lineup, with the Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM being the latest.  It replaced my long-serving Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM.

In this image, the big 200mm prime is mounted on my new Canon EOS 5D Mark IV, which is also a very recent acquisition.

A 200mm lens like this is not just an ordinary 200mm lens — at f/2, it is the fastest 200mm lens currently available for Canon EOS cameras.  Nikon also has a 200mm f/2 prime in its lineup.

At f/2, the bokeh is incredible, and I bought it to shoot it wide-open; to capture the unique look this lens produces.

I am looking forward to exploiting its capabilities.

Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM Coming Soon

In my last post, I related my thoughts about buying a Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM to replace my Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM.

Today, I officially set the wheels in motion to achieve this objective.

After recently being in contact with the manager of the store from which I prefer to buy, I visited the store today and paid a deposit on the lens.

The good news is that Canon Australia has two in the warehouse, that mine has already been ordered by the retailer, and that it should be available to pick up this week.

Fantastic!

I am looking forward to exploiting the capabilities of this lens to the fullest, and it will bring my lens lineup to the state I desire: all primes in the widest apertures currently available.

Naturally, this means that my long-serving (over ten years now) and excellent Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM will be departing, but being in near-mint condition, I am sure it will very quickly find a new home and serve a new owner for years to come.

The Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM will be a very welcome addition to my super-telephoto lens lineup, joining its big brothers, the Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS USM and the Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS USM.

In terms of gear acquisition and de-acqusition, 2017 has been a rather dramatic year, with two new lenses purchased, three long-serving lenses sold, an entire collection of filters sold, and a new set of filters acquired.

I think it is time for a rest.

Canon EF 500mm f/4L IS USM – Almost

Last week I had an opportunity to purchase a second-hand Canon EF 500mm f/4L IS USM at a very cheap price.

The big 500 is a lens I have long wanted, and it is an ideal lens and focal length for wildlife photography.

I decided to have a look at it, and I spent a fair bit of time with it.

It works fine, but it is not in the greatest condition.

A portion of the AF switch had been snapped off, which exposed the inside of the barrel — at least, the section below the switch panel.  That was concerning to me, as water could easily ingress the barrel.

Also, the front rim was in quite bad shape. It had copped a lot of bumps into hard objects.

I was told that it belonged to a paparazzo who used it on a motorbike.

Clearly it had collided with poles, walls, cars, the bike itself and heaven knows what else.

Despite a few paint scratches, the hood was in great shape.  I would expect that if it had been used much, it would have been well and truly trashed; I suspect it did not spend much time on the lens.

Even for the very cheap price I was offered, it was a risky and uncomfortable situation, and the lens would need to be serviced by Canon to address the damage, which could have been an expensive exercise.

The lens was in good condition relative to how it had been used; but a condition not good enough for my comfort level.

I decided not to proceed.

The following day, I began to think about the Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM.  I tried that lens at PMA Australia in 2008 when it was new.  It is a stunning lens, and having recently shot a few times with the long-discontinued and rare Canon EF 200mm f/1.8L USM, I would be very happy with a fast (faster than f/2.8) 200mm lens.

When I conducted some critical analysis, the truth is that I do not need a 500mm lens, as I can already achieve the 560mm focal length at f/4 by attaching my Canon Extender EF 1.4x II to my Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS USM.

What the 500mm prime has in its favour is lighter weight (enormously beneficial when travelling: 3.87kg vs. 5.37kg), and a sharper, native focal length of 500mm.  Having said that, of the three longest focal lengths I had in Kenya, 400mm was used most, followed by 800mm and 560mm.

What I cannot currently achieve is  f/2) at 200mm.  It has been a dream of mine for a number of years to replace my Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM with a Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM, as not only would the latter give me a brighter aperture at the 200mm focal length and a stunningly sharp lens, but it would switch me to a 100% prime lens rig.  I am a fan of fast primes, and presently I only have one zoom — one of the finest zoom lenses Canon has produced, incidentally.

I have asked my regular supplier (who has always given me good deals) for a price on a Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM.  If I can land a good price, I might just finally do this, and turn another lens replacement dream into a reality.

Farewell, Canon EF 180mm f/3.5L Macro USM

Today I sold my Canon EF 180mm f/3.5L Macro USM lens.

For a month or two, I had been thinking of offloading it, and once or twice previously, I had entertained the thought of selling it.

I was recently put into contact with someone who might be interested in it, and today the buyer collected it.

According to my lens utilisation statistics, it was my least used lens apart from my one-month-old Canon EF 14mm f/2.8L II USM.

Looking at my images, I have only shot 10 images with it in the last five years. Two images per year is not much, and I only published a total of 36 images during the time I owned it.

I am just not a macro shooter at all, and I find macro photography too frustrating for my liking.

It is a stunning lens and is in near-mint condition, but it just is not the kind of lens I use much or really need (despite having owned it for over nine years), so it is better for it to be in the possession of someone who will exploit its capabilities.

I will use the money from its sale to fund my NiSi 150mm filter system.

My original intention was to replace the lens with a Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM, but as nice as that lens is (I inspected one), it makes no sense at this point in time.

If I ever want a macro lens in the future, I’ll go and pick one up; but for now, the lack of a macro lens in my rig is not a hindrance.

With this most recent sale and last month’s replacement of my Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM with a Canon EF 14mm f/2.8L II USM, that amounts to two lenses gone from my lineup in less than two months!

I have optimised my lens lineup in several ways, and I am content with what is now in my rig.

I would still like to replace my Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM with a Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM, but for the foreseeable future, that notion will remain confined to the realm of wishful thinking.