Tag Archives: Bridge

Milson’s Point View

A view of the Sydney Harbour Bridge from Milson’s Point at twilight.

Milson's Point View

Milson’s Point View

This year I have decided to make more of an effort to get out and shoot regularly.

For this most recent weeknight shoot (my third of 2017), I decided to re-visit the Sydney Harbour Bridge, which I rarely photograph any more.

The last time I captured a serious image here was in 2005!

So, here it is: the iconic bridge for which Sydney is famous.

Views of Prague at Twilight

It is hard to believe, but it has been over a month since our trip to Prague.

While it was a short European getaway for only a few days, photographically, it was very productive and rewarding, and I certainly landed a few pleasing images in that short time.

Life has been quite busy since then, and I have unfortunately neglected to post about some of my images; so, below are the two images I captured on our first twilight in Prague.

Charles Bridge by Night

Charles Bridge by Night

From a photographer’s viewpoint, no trip to Prague would be complete without capturing an image of the iconic Charles Bridge at night.

The Charles Bridge (Karlův most) is a bridge in gothic architectural style, which was named after the esteemed King Charles IV.  It runs across the Vlatva from the Old Town to the Lesser Town, and is major route to Prague Castle up on the hill, adjacent to St Vitus Cathedral.

In summer, during the day, and indeed for much of the night, Charles Bridge is crammed with tourists and street merchants selling all manner of souvenirs.

Here is a view along Charles Bridge towards the Lesser Town on the other side, and Prague Castle and St Vitus Cathedral in the distance.

Praha Twilight

Praha Twilight

We had encountered this location earlier during the day on a four-hour walking tour of Prague, and I decided that it would be a good location for a shoot at twilight.

Despite the hoardes of tourists in the area, this easily accessible spot allows for a fairly uninterrupted view along the north side of Charles Bridge, plus the still reflections of the shoreline on the Vlatva.

2015 Retrospective: Intense and Focused

Now that we are well into the year 2016, it is time for a retrospective look at my photographic journey in 2015.

The year can be summarised as intense and focused, as the majority of images I captured during 2015 were in the Mara North Conservancy and Maasai Mara National Reserve in Kenya, where we embarked upon an incredible seven-day safari with our friend and safari leader Mario Moreno.

Looking at my statistics, I shot more images in 2015 than I did in the years 2013 and 2014 combined.

Had the Kenya trip not happened, I suspect I would not have shot much.

Photographically, my year started quite late — near the end of April — with a macro/still life image of a new watch I had been given:

Certina 1888

Certina 1888

We had some family in town from overseas, so I took the opportunity to shoot some cityscape images from a location at which I had not shot before.

One afternoon we headed to the Glebe apartment and I waited for the right light to capture some views of the beautiful city skyline.

This was the result:

Dusk Descendence

Dusk Descendence

And a little later, during blue hour:

The View Sucks

The View Sucks

I also took the opportunity to capture this tight view of the Anzac Bridge as twilight fell:

Anzac Bridge

Anzac Bridge

In May, we all had an outing at the Wild Life Sydney Zoo in Darling Harbour.  I took a camera and a couple of lenses, but I did not shoot a great deal of images.

This image of a kangaroo was one of the more pleasing images I captured on the day:

One of Skippy's Mates

One of Skippy’s Mates

Later in the month, I felt compelled to head out and shoot another cityscape.

In the mid-to-late afternoon, I scouted for some vantage points along the western side of Circular Quay, and finally settled on the observation deck of the International Passenger Terminal, which affords a higher view, and additionally was empty and free from passers by.

I waited for the blue hour, and captured this view of Sydney which I have not seen (or photographed) before.

Circular Quay West

Circular Quay West

It had been a slow, but pleasing enough start to the year.

In June, the photography I had been eagerly anticipating since we booked the trip the previous year, would finally happen.

We headed to Kenya to spend seven days in the Mara North Conservancy and Maasai Mara National Reserve, where we would re-ignite our passion for wildlife and landscape photography.

So far I have published over 100 images from that trip, so I will not publish a great deal of those images in this article; but as the trip brought us a lot of first-time encounters, I will instead present some selected highlights from the trip.

We were based in the luxurious eco-lodge Elephant Pepper Camp, which afforded us total isolation and positioning right in the middle of where the action was.

This is a view of one of Elephant Pepper Camp‘s honeymoon/family tents:

Elephant Pepper Camp's Honeymoon Tent

Elephant Pepper Camp’s Honeymoon Tent

And this is a view of the camp at twilight, depicting the dining tent, lounge and camp fire:

Around the Camp Fire

Around the Camp Fire

Highlights of the trip included one of my finest bird images, which was my first frame of only two I snapped while this pied kingfisher was bobbing up and down in flight:

Suspended

Suspended

Just about every day, we were treated to lions — most prominently, the Cheli Pride.  One of the fantastic things about the Cheli Pride was its abundance of cubs, and on this trip, it was our first time seeing wild cubs, such as this cute little lion:

Lion Cub of the Cheli Pride

Lion Cub of the Cheli Pride

On one afternoon, we were fortunate enough to spend some time, in pleasing, afternoon light, in very close proximity to a lilac-breasted roller, where I captured this and a number of other images of the national bird of South Africa:

Plumage

Plumage

Naturally, a safari in Africa encompasses more than just wildlife — there are amazing opportunities for stunning, iconic landscape shots, and we certainly took advantage of that, rolling out into the plains in the pre-dawn darkness before other safari-goers were even awake.

This was one of my earlier landscape shots, captured during a moody morning:

The Moody Mara Plains

The Moody Mara Plains

On another morning, we captured the ‘postcard shot’ of a rising sun behind a lone acacia tree:

Sunrise on the Mara

Sunrise on the Mara

This particular tree is known as Mario‘s Tree, as Mario often photographs it.  We certainly did — several times — including one particular morning which greeted us with a colourful sky:

Lone Acacia

Lone Acacia

On only our second day on this trip, we were treated to a number of first-time encounters.  In the morning, we encountered our first Mara leopard, who was also also the first leopard we had seen in a tree; and in the evening we found our first male lion of the trip, again a member of the resident Cheli Pride.

We had gone back to Leopard Gorge to look for the young male cat, when we found a large, dominant male lion in the area instead.  If the leopard was around, he was hiding and would not be seen.

Here is the beautiful young male leopard perched high in an elephant pepper tree:

Leopard of the Day

Leopard of the Day

We not only encountered one male lion, but two!  His brother also emerged from the distance and joined him for some bonding and lazing before the night‘s hunting commenced.

Here is one of the stunning Cheli Pride males we encountered:

Surveying

Surveying

The day after we met the dominant males, we encountered numerous members of the pride, minus the males, feasting on a zebra kill the next afternoon.  This was another ‘first’ for us, as we had hitherto never seen lions feasting on a kill.  It was quite a sight, as this wider image shows:

Feast

Feast

The next day, we spent a dramatic afternoon with the Cheli Pride again, firstly as we encountered one of the mothers on her own, out in the open, calling for the pride.

Here is an image I captured of the lioness in the warm afternoon light:

Cheli Mother

Cheli Mother

Before long, a mighty rainstorm descended upon us, which made the big cat uncomfortable, as well as presenting challenges for us.  As the rain began to subside, camera shutters sounded like rapid gunfire as we captured action shots of the lioness shaking the water from her head.

Shake It Off

Shake It Off

Towards the end of the trip, we spent one day further south in the Maasai Mara National Reserve, where we experienced yet another first.

So far, the one species of African big cat we had never seen in the wild was the cheetah.  On that trip, we finally encountered wild cheetahs.  It was an exciting experience to firstly see them from a distance, and then drive to position ourselves optimally to be ahead of where they were headed.  It became more exciting as the cheetahs got closer, and I had a few opportunities to photograph the family, which consisted of a mother and four sub-adults.

Here is one of the nicer images I captured of these amazing big cats:

Portrait of a Young Cheetah

Portrait of a Young Cheetah

It had been a long wait, but finally we spent some time with wild cheetahs.

Our next morning in the Mara consisted of a portrait shoot with Maasai tribesman called Baba, with whom we travelled to Mario‘s Tree, where we shot some dramatic silhouette portraits of him as the sun rose on one of our final days in the Mara.

Here is one of the more striking images I captured during the session:

Baba the Maasai

Baba the Maasai

Our final evening in the Mara brought something we could have never predicted, and something which is quite rare to see: mating leopards!

At first, we spotted a young female leopard high in a tree during the warm afternoon light, but within a short time, a large, amourous male emerged from the thicket, and the two leopards began (or continued with) their ritual of rapid, exposive mating sessions, which can last for days.

We spent the rest of the drive witnessing this amazing sight, and the following image captures an intense moment as the female expresses her displeasure at the male’s advances:

Growl of the Leopardess

Growl of the Leopardess

The next morning was our final, somewhat subdued game drive in the Mara before we would fly back to Nairobi for a night and another day before departing Kenya.  We were fortunate to encounter a small pod of hippos in a watering hole, where I had the opportunity to capture some relatively close-proximity images, such as this large hippo on the bank, less than 30 metres away:

Hippo on the Bank

Hippo on the Bank

Before too long, this amazging photographic journey came to its conclusion.

After the intensity of our Mara trip, and my generally low photographic output before the trip, it was not surprising that I did not shoot much afterwards.  In fact, I shot only one more image for the remaining six months of the year!

The one image I did capture was a macro image of some red and orange roses to commemmorate our anniversary.

Fifth

Fifth

And so concludes my photographic journey for 2015.  It indeed was an intense and focused year, with Kenya dominating my photographic output, but with a few other images here and there.

Pleasant Dawn on Sydney Harbour

Since my return to seascaping last week, I have been keen to head back out at dawn to shoot more seascapes.

On the one hand, I failed; but on the other hand, I succeeded — at capturing a different kind of image at dawn.

Having checked the weather and cloud situation the night before, I knew the sky would be largely plain, which is terrible for seascapes, but great for twilight cityscapes.

So, in the pre-dawn darkness, I headed to the city and ventured further away from Circular Quay, where I had been the previous day, and where, I decided, I would be keen to capture a cityscape, depicting both the older and newer buildings of Sydney at dawn.

Here is one of the earlier images I captured:

Before Sydney Awakens

Before Sydney Awakens

It was great to be at Dawes Point on the harbour early in the morning before anyone else was out and about.

At the time, the sun had not risen, but there was a pink and orange glow in the eastern sky, which was due to rise 35 minutes later.

I also turned the camera around and pointed to the west, where the sky was darker, but where the increasing warmth and softness of the early morning light cast a pleasing glow on the wooden walkway and buildings along Campbell’s Cove.

Along the Walkway

Along the Walkway

This is a view along the walkway at the northern end of Campbell’s Cove.

On the left is Campbell’s Cove and the old woolsheds in Sydney‘s historic The Rocks, which these days contain restaurants.

In the distance is the southern end of the Sydney Harbour Bridge.

On the right and in the distance central to the frame is the expensive and very nicely positioned Park Hyatt hotel.

One of the challenges presented when photographing a city like Sydney is to capture a less common view.  It’s all too easy to shoot the ‘postcard material’, but the city’s famous landmarks have been captured many times, and it’s difficult to depict a different or more interesting view of these, or of the city in general.

There are different views of the Sydney skyline, and this particular spot in Campbell’s Cove offers a view of the old and the new, and makes a change from the regular views we often see.

Later in the morning, I was treated to an unexpected and serendipitous sight of two large cruise ships making their way through the harbour.  The leading ship, Diamond Princess, docked at the Overseas Passenger Terminal depicted in my earlier image; while the second ship — a P&O oceanliner — sailed under the Sydney Harbour Bridge and docked at White Bay.

All in all, it was a nice, productive morning.

Last Night in London

It’s hard to believe that our London trip was nearly a year ago.

During a thoroughly enjoyable time there, I managed to land a few pleasing shots, one of which I had not published until just yesterday.  In fact I did publish the image, but it was a black and white version.

Here’s the original colour version of an image I captured of one of London’s iconic landmarks, during a rainy and gloomy night, which happened to be our last night in London.

Last Night in London

Last Night in London

 

Last Night in London

This composition is a slightly different take on an earlier image I published, depicting Westminster Bridge, Elizabeth Tower and the Houses of Parliament in London.

Last Night in London

Last Night in London

This was the last night of our fleeting five-day visit in May of 2013, so I’ve appropriately titled it Last Night in London.

Rather than depicting the rich colours of the blue hour light in stark contrast with the yellow illumination of Elizabeth Tower and the Houses of Parliament, I wanted to feature one of my favourite cities in a dramatic monochrome image.  This is the result.

London Blues

An image of the London Houses of Parliament, Elizabeth Tower, the Westminster Bridge and the River Thames was on my list of quintessential London scenes to capture during our fleeting five-day visit.

London Blues

London Blues

On the first night, it was wet and miserable, and my efforts down at Tower Bridge weren’t as pleasing as I had hoped.

On night two, we were on our way back to London from Ely and Cambridge, so a twilight shoot was not possible.

Night three saw us catching up for dinner with some good friends who have recently moved to London for a few years.

Night four was my last chance to capture the iconic scene.

The weather has been wet, cold and windy for the entire duration of the trip, but I decided that I was going to capture my image no matter what the weather presented.

After standing in cold rain for over an hour, waiting for the right light and for the lights to switch on and illuminate my subject, I finally landed my image.

It was worth it.