Hitech 10-Stop ND Filter on Order

I’ve just ordered a Hitech Pro Stop 10-stop neutral-densty filter.

As its name indicates, it’s a neutral-density filter which reduces the light intake by ten stops.  When fitted to a lens, the Pro Stop ten-stop filter reduces the light intake to about a thousandth of the light otherwise seen by the lens.

This significant light intake reduction allows for blurring of water, cloud and other movement in bright light, which can result in some dynamic, striking images.

I’ve been wanting a ten-stop ND filter for quite some time, and as a user of Lee ND and GND filters, I had hoped to procure a Lee Big Stopper; but this filter is unfortunately very hard to obtain, with long waiting times.

In the mean time, the newer version of the Hitech ten-stop ND filter has been receiving some positive reviews and gaining popularity amongst photographers like myself who are keen on long exposure imaging.

One of the big advantages of the Hitech filter is that it has a rubber/foam gasket on the rear side of the filter, which shields the lens from light spill between the filter and the filter holder.  It’s also cheaper than the Lee filter, and is made from resin rather than glass.

I’m looking forward to experimenting with this filter in my seascape, landscape and cityscape photography.

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7 thoughts on “Hitech 10-Stop ND Filter on Order

  1. Malcolm Katon

    I’ve recently purchased the same filter but have not yet had a chance to test it out. I’m intereted to see the results that you achieve with it.

    Malcolm

    Reply
    1. Xenedis Post author

      Thanks Malcolm.

      My supplier dropped me an email advising that it would be shipped today. It’s coming from England, so it might take a week. If I receive it while I’m still on leave, I’ll be keen to head out and give it a run.

      Reply
  2. Michelle

    I spent the day with this filter yesterday and was very frustrated. Whatever I did with the white balance on my 7d every image came out with a very strong colour cast of either blue or magenta. I’m sure it’s me and I’ll have an epiphany but if youngest there first please share how you did it :) Good luck!

    Reply
    1. Xenedis Post author

      I’ve also found that my filter produces a very blue colour cast, but I’d need to spend more time working with it, as the two mornings on which I used it were very cloudy/bluish anyway, so thi may have contributed towards the result.

      Reply

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